Sunders vs Sanders - What's the difference?

sunders | sanders |


As a noun sunders

is .

As a proper noun sanders is

.

sunders

English

Verb

(head)
  • (sunder)
  • Anagrams

    *

    sunder

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl), from (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (dialectal, or, obsolete) Sundry; separate; different.
  • Derived terms
    *

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) . More at sundry.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To break or separate or to break apart, especially with force.
  • To , separate.
  • {{quote-book
    , year=2003 , year_published= , edition= , editor= , author=Dean Barton , title=Searching for the Evergreen Man , chapter= citation , genre= , publisher=Llumina Press , isbn=9781932047233 , page=69 , passage=… Carlo finally saw Everything, before it sunders' into things; he saw Knowledge before it '''sunders''' into knowing; he saw Integrity before it '''sunders''' in integrals; he saw Unity before it ' sunders into units. }}
  • (UK, dialect, dated, transitive) To expose to the sun and wind.
  • (Halliwell)
    Quotations
    * 1881 , Severed Selves, lines 8-9 *: '' Two souls, the shores wave-mocked of sundering seas: — *: '' Such are we now.
    Derived terms
    * asunder * sunderance

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a separation into parts; a division or severance
  • * 1939 , , Additional Poems , VII, lines 2-4
  • He would not stay for me to stand and gaze.
    I shook his hand and tore my heart in sunder
    And went with half my life about my ways.

    Anagrams

    * ----

    sanders

    English

    Noun

    (head)
  • (obsolete) sandalwood, especially the red sandalwood