Bit vs Sample - What's the difference?

bit | sample |


As a verb bit

is to beat (to strike or pound repeatedly).

As an initialism sample is

(emergency medicine) initialism of signs and symptoms, allergies, medications, past pertinent history, last oral intake, events leading to present illness .

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

bit

English

(wikipedia bit)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) bita and bite - all from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A piece of metal placed in a horse's mouth and connected to reins to direct the animal.
  • A rotary cutting tool fitted to a drill, used to bore holes.
  • (dated, British) A coin of a specified value. (Also used for a nine-pence coin in the British Caribbean)
  • (US) An eighth of a dollar. Note that there is no coin minted worth 12.5 cents. (When this term first came into use, the Spanish 8 reales coin was widely used as a dollar equivalent, and thus the 1 real coin was equivalent to 12.5 cents.)
  • (historical, US) In the southern and southwestern states, a small silver coin (such as the real) formerly current; commonly, one worth about 12½ cents; also, the sum of 12½ cents.
  • A small amount of something.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=15 citation , passage=‘No,’ said Luke, grinning at her. ‘You're not dull enough! […] What about the kid's clothes? I don't suppose they were anything to write home about, but didn't you keep anything? A bootee or a bit of embroidery or anything at all?’}}
  • (informal) Specifically , a small amount of time.
  • A portion of something.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Catherine Clabby
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= Focus on Everything , passage=Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus.
  • Somewhat; something, but not very great; also used like jot and whit to express the smallest degree.
  • Am I bored? Not a bit of it!
  • * T. Hook
  • My young companion was a bit of a poet.
  • (slang) A prison sentence, especially a short one.
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • (An excerpt of material) An excerpt of material making up part of a show, comedy routine, etc.
  • The part of a key which enters the lock and acts upon the bolt and tumblers.
  • (Knight)
  • The cutting iron of a plane.
  • (Knight)
    Synonyms
    * (coin) coin, piece * (small piece) morsel (of food), piece, scrap * (portion) portion, share, segment * (horse equipment) snaffle, pelham, kimberwicke
    Derived terms
    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Adverb

    (-)
  • To a small extent; in a small amount (usually with "a").
  • That's a bit too sweet.

    Verb

    (bitt)
  • To put a bridle upon; to put the bit in the mouth of (a horse).
  • Etymology 2

    See bite

    Verb

    (head)
  • (bite)
  • Your dog bit me!
  • , bitten
  • I have been bit by your dog!

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (label) bitten.
  • (label) Having been bitten.
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Etymology 3

    Coined by (John Tukey) in 1946 as an abbreviation of (binary digit), probably influenced by connotations of “small portion”.[http://www.princeton.edu/pr/news/98/q2/0602-honorary.html][http://www.thocp.net/timeline/1944.htm
  • 1946] First used in print 1948 by (Claude Shannon). Compare (byte) and (nybble).
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • (mathematics, computing) A binary digit, generally represented as a 1 or 0.
  • (computing) The smallest unit of storage in a digital computer, consisting of a binary digit.
  • (information theory, cryptography) Any datum that may take on one of exactly two values.
  • status bits''' on IRC; permission '''bits in a file system
  • (information theory) A unit of measure for information entropy.
  • * {{quote-web, date = 2011-05-17
  • , author = Lisa Grossman , title = Entropy Is Universal Rule of Language , site = Wired Science , url = http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/05/universal-entropy/ , accessdate = 2012-09-26}}
    The researchers found that the original texts spanned a variety of entropy values in different languages, reflecting differences in grammar and structure.
    But strangely, the difference in entropy between the original, ordered text and the randomly scrambled text was constant across languages. This difference is a way to measure the amount of information encoded in word order, Montemurro says. The amount of information lost when they scrambled the text was about 3.5 bits per word.
    Synonyms
    * (smallest unit of storage) b
    Derived terms
    * bit-depth * bitwise * hidden bit * high-order bit * least significant bit * most significant bit * * * * *
    See also
    * ban, nat, qubit

    Statistics

    *

    sample

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A part of anything taken or presented for inspection, or shown as evidence of the quality of the whole; a specimen; as, goods are often purchased by samples.
  • "I design this but for a sample of what I hope more fully to discuss." -Woodward.
  • (statistics) A subset of a population selected for measurement, observation or questioning, to provide statistical information about the population.
  • "...it is possible it [the Anglo-Saxon race] might stand second to the Scandinavian countries [in average height] if a fair sample of their population were obtained." Francis Galton et al. (1883). Final Report of the Anthropometric Committee, Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, p. 269.
  • (cooking) a small piece of food for tasting, typically given away for free
  • (business) a small piece of some goods, for determining quality, colour, etc., typically given away for free
  • (music) Gratuitous borrowing of easily recognised phases (or moments) from other music (or movies) in a recording, used to emphasize a particular point by implying a certain context.
  • (obsolete) Example; pattern.
  • * Shakespeare
  • a sample to the youngest
  • * Fairfax
  • Thus he concludes, and every hardy knight / His sample followed.

    Synonyms

    * specimen * example

    Verb

  • To make or show something similar to; to match.
  • To take or to test a sample or samples of; as, to sample sugar, teas, wool, cloth.
  • (signal processing) To reduce a continuous signal (such as a sound wave) to a discrete signal.
  • To reuse a portion of (an existing sound recording) in a new song.
  • Anagrams

    *