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Wallet vs Sallet - What's the difference?

wallet | sallet |

As nouns the difference between wallet and sallet

is that wallet is a small case, often flat and often made of leather, for keeping money (especially paper money), credit cards, etc while sallet is (historical) a type of light spherical helmet or sallet can be .

wallet

English

(wikipedia wallet)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A small case, often flat and often made of leather, for keeping money (especially paper money), credit cards, etc.
  • The thief stole all the money and credit cards out of the old man's wallet .
  • (by extension, slang) A person's bank account or assets.
  • It's unknown if the pro running back's recent sex scandal will hit him in the wallet or not.
  • A thick case or folder with plastic sleeves in which compact discs may be stored.
  • I won an auction online for a cheap CD wallet .
  • (archaic) A bag or pouch.
  • He brought with him a large wallet with some provisions for the road.

    Synonyms

    * billfold * pocketbook

    See also

    * purse

    Anagrams

    *

    sallet

    English

    (wikipedia sallet)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) salade, from (etyl) celada, thought to be from (etyl) (although the Latin word is not attested in this sense).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (historical) A type of light spherical helmet
  • * 1786 , , A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons , page 11.
  • At Hampton Court, sallets for archers on horseback, sallets with grates, and old sallets with vizards: At Windsor, salettes and skulls: At Calais, saletts with vysars and bevers, and salets with bevers.
    Synonyms
    *

    Etymology 2

    Alternative forms.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • * 1602 : , act 2 scene 2 lines 378-383
  • I remember one said
    there were no sallets in the lines to make the matter
    savoury nor no matter in the phrase that might indict
    the author of affection, but called it an honest method,
    as wholesome as sweet, and by very much more
    handsome than fine.

    Anagrams

    * *