Hull vs Sail - What's the difference?

hull | sail |


As a verb hull

is .

As a noun sail is

salt.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

hull

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • The outer covering of a fruit or seed
  • Synonyms
    * (outer covering of fruit or seed ): husk, shell
    Derived terms
    * ahull * monohull * multihull * twinhull * tank hull * hull-down

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To remove the outer covering of a fruit or seed.
  • She sat on the back porch hulling peanuts.
    Synonyms
    * (to remove hull of a fruit or seed ): peel, husk, shell, shuck

    Etymology 2

    Origin uncertain; perhaps the same word as Etymology 1, above.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The body or frame of a vessel such as a ship or plane
  • * Dryden
  • Deep in their hulls our deadly bullets light.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete, intransitive, nautical) To drift; to be carried by the impetus of wind or water on the ship's hull alone, with sails furled
  • *, II.1:
  • *:We goe not, but we are carried: as things that flote, now gliding gently, now hulling violently, according as the water is, either stormy or calme.
  • To hit (a ship) in the hull with cannon fire etc.
  • ----

    sail

    English

    (wikipedia sail)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) 'to cut'. More at saw.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (nautical) A piece of fabric attached to a boat and arranged such that it causes the wind to drive the boat along. The sail may be attached to the boat via a combination of mast, spars and ropes.
  • * : Scene 1: 496-497
  • When we have laugh'd to see the sails conceive / And grow big-bellied with the wanton wind;
  • (uncountable) The power harnessed by a sail or sails, or the use this power for travel or transport.
  • A trip in a boat, especially a sailboat.
  • Let's go for a sail .
  • (dated) A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft. Plural sail .
  • Twenty sail were in sight.
  • The blade of a windmill.
  • A tower-like structure found on the dorsal (topside) surface of submarines.
  • The floating organ of siphonophores, such as the Portuguese man-of-war.
  • (fishing) A sailfish.
  • We caught three sails today.
  • (paleontology) an outward projection of the
  • Anything resembling a sail, such as a wing.
  • * Spenser
  • Like an eagle soaring / To weather his broad sails .
    Hyponyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * balloon sail * by sail * drag sail * dragon sail * point of sail * sailback * sailboard * sailboat * sailcloth * sailer * sailfish * sailing * studding sail * set sail * take the wind out of someone's sails * topsail * working sail

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) , cognate to earlier Middle Low German segelen and its descendant Low German sailen.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by steam or other power.
  • To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a waterfowl.
  • To ride in a boat, especially a sailboat.
  • To set sail; to begin a voyage.
  • We sail for Australia tomorrow.
  • To move briskly and gracefully through the air.
  • * Shakespeare
  • As is a winged messenger of heaven, / When he bestrides the lazy pacing clouds, / And sails upon the bosom of the air.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=April 15 , author=Saj Chowdhury , title=Norwich 2 - 1 Nott'm Forest , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=A hopeful ball from Forest right-back Brendan Moloney to the left edge of the area was met first by Ruddy but his attempted clearance rebounded off Tyson's leg and sailed in.}}
  • To move briskly.
  • Derived terms
    * sail close to the wind