Sail vs Canvas - What's the difference?

sail | canvas |


As nouns the difference between sail and canvas

is that sail is (nautical) a piece of fabric attached to a boat and arranged such that it causes the wind to drive the boat along the sail may be attached to the boat via a combination of mast, spars and ropes while canvas is a type of coarse cloth, woven from hemp, useful for making sails and tents or as a surface for paintings.

As verbs the difference between sail and canvas

is that sail is to be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by steam or other power while canvas is to cover an area or object with canvas.

sail

English

(wikipedia sail)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) 'to cut'. More at saw.

Noun

(en noun)
  • (nautical) A piece of fabric attached to a boat and arranged such that it causes the wind to drive the boat along. The sail may be attached to the boat via a combination of mast, spars and ropes.
  • * : Scene 1: 496-497
  • When we have laugh'd to see the sails conceive / And grow big-bellied with the wanton wind;
  • (uncountable) The power harnessed by a sail or sails, or the use this power for travel or transport.
  • A trip in a boat, especially a sailboat.
  • Let's go for a sail .
  • (dated) A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft. Plural sail .
  • Twenty sail were in sight.
  • The blade of a windmill.
  • A tower-like structure found on the dorsal (topside) surface of submarines.
  • The floating organ of siphonophores, such as the Portuguese man-of-war.
  • (fishing) A sailfish.
  • We caught three sails today.
  • (paleontology) an outward projection of the
  • Anything resembling a sail, such as a wing.
  • * Spenser
  • Like an eagle soaring / To weather his broad sails .
    Hyponyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * balloon sail * by sail * drag sail * dragon sail * point of sail * sailback * sailboard * sailboat * sailcloth * sailer * sailfish * sailing * studding sail * set sail * take the wind out of someone's sails * topsail * working sail

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) , cognate to earlier Middle Low German segelen and its descendant Low German sailen.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by steam or other power.
  • To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a waterfowl.
  • To ride in a boat, especially a sailboat.
  • To set sail; to begin a voyage.
  • We sail for Australia tomorrow.
  • To move briskly and gracefully through the air.
  • * Shakespeare
  • As is a winged messenger of heaven, / When he bestrides the lazy pacing clouds, / And sails upon the bosom of the air.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=April 15 , author=Saj Chowdhury , title=Norwich 2 - 1 Nott'm Forest , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=A hopeful ball from Forest right-back Brendan Moloney to the left edge of the area was met first by Ruddy but his attempted clearance rebounded off Tyson's leg and sailed in.}}
  • To move briskly.
  • Derived terms
    * sail close to the wind

    canvas

    English

    (wikipedia canvas)

    Noun

    (en-noun) (see usage notes)
  • A type of coarse cloth, woven from hemp, useful for making sails and tents or as a surface for paintings.
  • * 1882 , James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England , Volume 4, p. 556.
  • The term canvas is very widely used, as well to denote the coarse fabrics employed for kitchen use, as for strainers, and wraps for meat, as for the best quality of ordinary table and shirting linen. \
  • A piece of canvas cloth stretched across a frame on which one may paint.
  • A basis for creative work.
  • The author takes rural midwestern life as a canvas for a series of tightly woven character studies .
  • (computer graphics) A region on which graphics can be rendered.
  • (nautical) sails in general
  • A tent.
  • He spent the night under canvas .
  • A painting, or a picture on canvas.
  • (Goldsmith)
  • * Macaulay
  • Light, rich as that which glows on the canvas of Claude.
  • A rough draft or model of a song, air, or other literary or musical composition; especially one to show a poet the measure of the verses he is to make.
  • (Grabb)
  • Usage notes

    The plural is used in the UK and most UK-influenced areas.

    Verb

    (es)
  • To cover an area or object with canvas.