Eager vs Sager - What's the difference?

eager | sager |


As adjectives the difference between eager and sager

is that eager is (obsolete) sharp; sour; acid while sager is (sage).

As a noun eager

is (tidal bore).

eager

English

(Webster 1913)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) eger, from (etyl) egre (French aigre), from (etyl) ; see acid, acerb, etc. Compare vinegar, alegar.

Adjective

(er)
  • (obsolete) Sharp; sour; acid.
  • * Shakespeare
  • like eager droppings into milk
  • (obsolete) Sharp; keen; bitter; severe.
  • * Shakespeare
  • eager words
  • * Shakespeare
  • a nipping and an eager air
  • (rfc-sense) Excited by desire in the pursuit of any object; ardent to pursue, perform, or obtain; keenly desirous; hotly longing; earnest; zealous; impetuous; vehement.
  • * Keble
  • When to her eager lips is brought / Her infant's thrilling kiss.
  • * Hawthorne
  • a crowd of eager and curious schoolboys
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=19 citation , passage=When Timothy and Julia hurried up the staircase to the bedroom floor, where a considerable commotion was taking place, Tim took Barry Leach with him. […]. The captive made no resistance and came not only quietly but in a series of eager little rushes like a timid dog on a choke chain.}}
  • Brittle; inflexible; not ductile.
  • * John Locke
  • Gold will be sometimes so eager , as artists call it, that it will as little endure the hammer as glass itself.
  • (comptheory) Not employing lazy evaluation; calculating results immediately, rather than deferring calculation until they are required.
  • an eager algorithm
    Synonyms
    * raring
    Derived terms
    * eager beaver * eagerly * eagerness

    Etymology 2

    See (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (tidal bore).
  • Anagrams

    *

    sager

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (sage)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    sage

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) sage (11th century), from . The noun meaning "man of profound wisdom" is recorded from circa 1300. Originally applied to the Seven Sages of Greece .

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Wise.
  • * Shakespeare
  • All you sage counsellors, hence!
  • * Milton
  • commanders, who, cloaking their fear under show of sage advice, counselled the general to retreat
  • (obsolete) grave; serious; solemn
  • * Milton
  • [Great bards] in sage and solemn tunes have sung.
    Synonyms
    * sagacious

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A wise person or spiritual teacher; a man or woman of gravity and wisdom, especially, a teacher venerable for years, and of sound judgment and prudence; a grave or stoic philosopher.
  • * 1748 , (David Hume), Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral , London: Oxford University Press (1973), ยง 34:
  • We aspire to the magnanimous firmness of the philosophic sage .
    Synonyms
    * deep thinker, egghead, intellectual, pundit
    Derived terms
    * sagely * sageness * sage on the stage * Seven Sages

    See also

    * rishi * maharishi

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) sauge, from (etyl) salvia, from , see safe .

    Noun

    (-)
  • The plant Salvia officinalis and savory spice produced from it; also planted for ornamental purposes.
  • Synonyms
    * (herb) ramona
    Derived terms
    * sagebush * Sage Derby * sage dog * sage green * sage grouse * sage tea * sage thrasher * wood sage
    See also
    * salvia

    Etymology 3

    .

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (Internet slang)
  • Verb

    (sag)
  • (Internet slang) The act of using the word or option sage in the email field or a checkbox of an imageboard when posting a reply
  • Usage notes

    * This word is specific to imageboards. The original purpose of sage is to not bump a thread if one deems one's own post to be of little value.