Stage vs Sage - What's the difference?

stage | sage |


As verbs the difference between stage and sage

is that stage is to produce on a stage, to perform a play while sage is first-person singular indicative present form of .

As a noun stage

is a phase.

stage

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A phase.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • Such a polity is suited only to a particular stage in the progress of society.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-28, author=(Joris Luyendijk)
  • , volume=189, issue=3, page=21, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Our banks are out of control , passage=Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. […]  But the scandals kept coming, and so we entered stage three – what therapists call "bargaining". A broad section of the political class now recognises the need for change but remains unable to see the necessity of a fundamental overhaul. Instead it offers fixes and patches.}}
  • The area, in any theatre, generally raised, upon which an audience watches plays or other public ceremonies.
  • * (Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • Knights, squires, and steeds must enter on the stage .
  • * (1791–1875)
  • Lo! Where the stage , the poor, degraded stage, / Holds its warped mirror to a gaping age.
  • A floor or storey of a house.
  • (Wyclif)
  • A floor elevated for the convenience of mechanical work, etc.; scaffolding; staging.
  • A platform, often floating, serving as a kind of wharf.
  • A stagecoach, an enclosed horsedrawn carriage used to carry passengers.
  • * (William Cowper) (1731-1800)
  • a parcel sent you by the stage
  • * (Jonathan Swift) (1667–1745)
  • I went in the sixpenny stage .
  • (label) A place of rest on a regularly travelled road; a station; a place appointed for a relay of horses.
  • (label) A degree of advancement in a journey; one of several portions into which a road or course is marked off; the distance between two places of rest on a road.
  • * Jeffrey
  • A stage signifies a certain distance on a road.
  • * 1858 , (Samuel Smiles), (Robert Stephenson), The Life of George Stephenson: Railway Engineer , p.356
  • He travelled by gig, with his wife, his favourite horse performing the journey by easy stages .
  • *{{quote-book, year=1910, author=(Emerson Hough)
  • , title= The Purchase Price, chapter=3 , passage=The Mount Vernon , favoured by a good stage of water, soon cleared the narrow Monongahela channel, passed the confluence, and headed down under full steam, […].}}
  • (label) The number of an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
  • The place on a microscope where the slide is located for viewing.
  • (label) A level; one of the sequential areas making up the game.
  • A place where anything is publicly exhibited, or a remarkable affair occurs; the scene.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • When we are born, we cry that we are come / To this stage of fools.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • Music and ethereal mirth / Wherewith the stage of air and earth did ring.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 2, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC
  • , title= Bulgaria 0-3 England , passage=Rooney's United team-mate Chris Smalling was given his debut at right-back and was able to adjust to the international stage in relatively relaxed fashion as Bulgaria barely posed a threat of any consequence.}}

    Synonyms

    * (phase) tier, level

    Derived terms

    * sage on the stage * stagecoach * stage-door Johnny * stage whisper * staging area

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To produce on a stage, to perform a play.
  • The local theater group will stage "Pride and Prejudice".
  • To demonstrate in a deceptive manner.
  • The salesman’s demonstration of the new cleanser was staged to make it appear highly effective.
  • (Of a protest or strike etc.) To carry out.
  • To cause to pause or wait at a designated location.
  • We staged the cars to be ready for the start, then waited for the starter to drop the flag.
    to stage data to be written at a later time

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    sage

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) sage (11th century), from . The noun meaning "man of profound wisdom" is recorded from circa 1300. Originally applied to the Seven Sages of Greece .

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Wise.
  • * Shakespeare
  • All you sage counsellors, hence!
  • * Milton
  • commanders, who, cloaking their fear under show of sage advice, counselled the general to retreat
  • (obsolete) grave; serious; solemn
  • * Milton
  • [Great bards] in sage and solemn tunes have sung.
    Synonyms
    * sagacious

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A wise person or spiritual teacher; a man or woman of gravity and wisdom, especially, a teacher venerable for years, and of sound judgment and prudence; a grave or stoic philosopher.
  • * 1748 , (David Hume), Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral , London: Oxford University Press (1973), § 34:
  • We aspire to the magnanimous firmness of the philosophic sage .
    Synonyms
    * deep thinker, egghead, intellectual, pundit
    Derived terms
    * sagely * sageness * sage on the stage * Seven Sages

    See also

    * rishi * maharishi

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) sauge, from (etyl) salvia, from , see safe .

    Noun

    (-)
  • The plant Salvia officinalis and savory spice produced from it; also planted for ornamental purposes.
  • Synonyms
    * (herb) ramona
    Derived terms
    * sagebush * Sage Derby * sage dog * sage green * sage grouse * sage tea * sage thrasher * wood sage
    See also
    * salvia

    Etymology 3

    .

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (Internet slang)
  • Verb

    (sag)
  • (Internet slang) The act of using the word or option sage in the email field or a checkbox of an imageboard when posting a reply
  • Usage notes

    * This word is specific to imageboards. The original purpose of sage is to not bump a thread if one deems one's own post to be of little value.