Suddenest vs Saddenest - What's the difference?

suddenest | saddenest |


As an adjective suddenest

is (sudden).

As a verb saddenest is

(archaic) (sadden).

suddenest

English

Adjective

(head)
  • (sudden)

  • sudden

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Happening quickly and with little or no warning.
  • *, chapter=1
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients, chapter=1 , passage=I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes. Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.}}
  • (obsolete) Hastily prepared or employed; quick; rapid.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Never was such a sudden scholar made.
  • * Milton
  • the apples of Asphaltis, appearing goodly to the sudden eye
  • (obsolete) Hasty; violent; rash; precipitate.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I have no joy of this contract to-night: It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden

    Antonyms

    * gradual * unsudden

    Derived terms

    * all of a sudden * sudden death * suddenly * suddenness * suddenwoven

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • (poetic) Suddenly.
  • * Milton
  • Herbs of every leaf that sudden flowered.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) An unexpected occurrence; a surprise.
  • Derived terms

    * all of a sudden * all of the sudden * of a sudden

    Statistics

    *

    saddenest

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (archaic) (sadden)

  • sadden

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to make sad or unhappy
  • * (Alexander Pope)
  • * , chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=The turmoil went on—no rest, no peace. […] It was nearly eleven o'clock now, and he strolled out again. In the little fair created by the costers' barrows the evening only seemed beginning; and the naphtha flares made one's eyes ache, the men's voices grated harshly, and the girls' faces saddened one.}}
  • (rare) to become sad or unhappy
  • * {{quote-book, year=1999, author=Mary Ann Mitchell, title=Drawn To The Grave citation
  • , passage=Hyacinth perfume tickled her senses, making her feel giddy, but she saddened when she saw how uncared for the garden was.}}
  • (rare) to darken a color during dyeing
  • to render heavy or cohesive
  • * Mortimer
  • Marl is binding, and saddening of land is the great prejudice it doth to clay lands.