Sack vs Poke - What's the difference?

sack | poke | Synonyms |

Poke is a synonym of sack.


As nouns the difference between sack and poke

is that sack is a bag; especially a large bag of strong, coarse material for storage and handling of various commodities, such as potatoes, coal, coffee; or, a bag with handles used at a supermarket, a grocery sack; or, a small bag for small items, a satchel or sack can be (dated) a variety of light-colored dry wine from spain or the canary islands; also, any strong white wine from southern europe; sherry while poke is (us|slang) a lazy person; a dawdler or poke can be (computing) the storage of a value in a memory address, typically to modify the behaviour of a program or to cheat at a video game or poke can be or poke can be (dialectal) pokeweed.

As verbs the difference between sack and poke

is that sack is to put in a sack or sacks while poke is to prod or jab with a pointed object such as a finger or a stick.

sack

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) . (Sense evolution) * “Pillage” senses from the use of sacks in carrying off plunder. From (etyl) . ''See also ransack. American football “tackle” sense from this “plunder, conquer” root. * “Removal from employment” senses attested since 1825; the original formula was “to give (someone) the sack”, likely from the notion of a worker going off with his tools in a sack, or being given such a sack for his personal belongings as part of an expedient severance. Idiom exists earlier in (etyl) (on luy a donné son sac'', 17c.) and (etyl) (iemand den zak geven). English verb in this sense recorded from 1841. Current verb, ''to sack (“to fire”) carries influence from the forceful nature of “plunder, tackle” verb senses. * Slang meaning “bunk, bed” is attested since 1825, originally nautical, likely in reference to sleeping bags. The verb meaning “go to bed” is recorded from 1946.

Noun

(en noun)
  • A bag; especially a large bag of strong, coarse material for storage and handling of various commodities, such as potatoes, coal, coffee; or, a bag with handles used at a supermarket, a grocery sack; or, a small bag for small items, a satchel.
  • The amount a sack holds; also, an archaic or historical measure of varying capacity, depending on commodity type and according to local usage; an old English measure of weight, usually of wool, equal to 13 stone (182 pounds), or in other sources, 26 stone (364 pounds).
  • * The American sack''' of salt is 215 pounds; the '''sack of wheat, two bushels. — McElrath.
  • * 1843 , The Penny Cyclopaedia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge , Vol. 27, page 202
  • Seven pounds make a clove, 2 cloves a stone, 2 stone a tod, 6 1/2 tods a wey, 2 weys a sack, 12 sacks a last. [...] It is to be observed here that a sack is 13 tods, and a tod 28 pounds, so that the sack is 364 pounds.
  • * 1882 , , A History of Agriculture and Prices in England , Volume 4, page 209
  • Generally, however, the stone or petra, almost always of 14 lbs., is used, the tod of 28 lbs., and the sack of thirteen stone.
  • (uncountable) The plunder and pillaging of a captured town or city.
  • The sack of Rome.
  • (uncountable) Loot or booty obtained by pillage.
  • (American football) A successful tackle of the quarterback. See verb sense3 below .
  • (baseball) One of the square bases anchored at first base, second base, or third base.
  • He twisted his ankle sliding into the sack at second.
  • (informal) Dismissal from employment, or discharge from a position, usually as give (someone) the sack' or '''get the sack . ''See verb sense4 below.
  • The boss is gonna give her the sack today.
    He got the sack for being late all the time.
  • (colloquial, US) Bed; usually as hit the sack' or '''in the sack'''. ''See also'' ' sack out .
  • (dated) (also sacque ) A kind of loose-fitting gown or dress with sleeves which hangs from the shoulders, such as a gown with a , fashionable in the late 17th to 18th century; or, formerly, a loose-fitting hip-length jacket, cloak or cape.
  • * 1749 , , Google Books
  • Molly, therefore, having dressed herself out in this sack , with a new laced cap, and some other ornaments which Tom had given her, repairs to church with her fan in her hand the very next Sunday.
  • (dated) A sack coat; a kind of coat worn by men, and extending from top to bottom without a cross seam.
  • (vulgar, slang) The scrotum.
  • He got passed the ball, but it hit him in the sack .
    Synonyms
    * (bag) bag, tote, poke (obsolete) * the axe]], pink slip, the boot, the chop, the elbow, one's cards, [[give somebody the heave-ho, the old heave-ho * hay, rack * ballsack, ball sack, nutsack
    Hyponyms
    * (bag) bindle
    Derived terms
    * * ballsack, ball sack * bivouac sack * cat in the sack * dub sack * get the sack, give the sack * gunny sack, gunnysack * hacky sack, hackysack * Hacky-Sack, hackeysack, * hit the sack * in the sack * nutsack * sackcloth * sack race * sackful * sacking (n. ) * sad sack

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To put in a sack or sacks.
  • Help me sack the groceries.
  • * 1903 , ,
  • The gold was sacked in moose-hide bags, fifty pounds to the bag
  • To bear or carry in a sack upon the back or the shoulders.
  • To plunder or pillage, especially after capture; to obtain spoils of war from.
  • The barbarians sacked Rome.
  • * 1898 , ,
  • It [a lyre] was part of the spoils which he had taken when he sacked the city of Eetion
  • (American football) To tackle, usually to tackle the offensive quarterback behind the line of scrimmage before he is able to throw a pass.
  • * 1995 , John Crumpacker and Gwen Knapp, " Sack-happy defensive line stuns Dolphins", SFGate.com, November 21,
  • On third down, the rejuvenated Rickey Jackson stormed in over All-Pro left tackle Richmond Webb to sack Marino yet again for a 2-yard loss.
  • (informal) To discharge from a job or position; to fire.
  • He was sacked last September.
  • * 1999 , " Russian media mogul dismisses Yeltsin's bid to sack him", CNN.com, March 5,
  • (colloquial) In the phrase sack out', to fall asleep. ''See also'' ' hit the sack .
  • The kids all sacked out before 9:00 on New Year’s Eve.
    Synonyms
    * loot, ransack * (to remove someone from a job) can, dismiss, fire, lay off, let go, terminate, make redundant, give the axe, give the boot, give (someone) their cards, give the chop]], give the elbow, give the old heave-ho, See also : [[Wikisaurus:lay off * rack
    Derived terms
    * sackable * sacker * sack out

    Etymology 2

    From earlier (wyne)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (dated) A variety of light-colored dry wine from Spain or the Canary Islands; also, any strong white wine from southern Europe; sherry.
  • *
  • Will't please your lordship drink a cup of sack'? ...I ne'er drank ' sack in my life...
  • *
  • Thou art so fat-witted, with drinking of old sack'...let a cup of '''sack''' be my poison...Wherein is he good, but to taste ' sack and drink it?
  • * 1610 , , act 2 scene 2
  • How didst thou 'scape? How cam'st thou hither? swear / by this bottle how thou cam'st hither—I escaped upon / a butt of sack , which the sailors heaved overboard, by / this bottle! [...]
    Derived terms
    * sack-whey

    Etymology 3

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • See also

    * (wikipedia "sack") *

    Anagrams

    * *

    poke

    English

    Etymology 1

    Perhaps from (etyl) poken or (etyl) poken (both from (etyl) ), perhaps imitative.

    Verb

    (pok)
  • To prod or jab with a pointed object such as a finger or a stick.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Liverpool 0 - 1 Wolverhampton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Ward showed good pace to beat the advancing Reina to the ball and poke a low finish into the corner.}}
  • To poke a fire to remove ash or promote burning.
  • (figuratively) To rummage as in to poke about in.
  • (computing) To modify the value stored in (a memory address).
  • * 1984 , Franco Frey, SPECGRAFFITI'' (in ''Crash magazine, issue 6, July 1984)
  • The 200 UDGs may be used either by paging between 10 sets of 20 UDGs or, alternatively, by displaying 96 different characters by poking the system variable CHARS with 256 less than the starting address of your graphics.
  • * 1985 , Tom Weishaar, Bert Kersey, The DOStalk Scrapbook (page 44)
  • If you try to poke a value outside this range into a byte, Basic will beep you with an ILLEGAL QUANTITY error.
  • To put a poke on.
  • to poke an ox
  • To thrust with the horns; to gore.
  • (informal, internet) To notify.
  • (label) To thrust (something) in a particular direction such as the tongue.
  • Derived terms
    {{der3, poke along , poke bonnet , poke box , poke fun , toepoke}}

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (US, slang) A lazy person; a dawdler.
  • (US, slang) A stupid or uninteresting person.
  • (Bartlett)
  • (US) A device to prevent an animal from leaping or breaking through fences, consisting of a yoke with a pole inserted, pointed forward.
  • (computing) The storage of a value in a memory address, typically to modify the behaviour of a program or to cheat at a video game.
  • * 1988 , "Lloyd Mangram", Forum'' (in ''Crash magazine issue 54, July 1988)
  • Perhaps all those super hackers who so regularly produce infinite lives etc. could produce pokes to be used by 128K users.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) poke, whence pocket

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • * c. 1386 , , The Canterbury Tales'', ''The Miller's Prologue and Tale :
  • Gerveys answerde, “Certes, were it gold,
    Or in a poke nobles alle untold,
    Thou sholdest have, as I am trewe smyth.
  • * c. 1599 , , As You Like It , act 2, scene 7:
  • And then he drew a dial from his poke ,
    And, looking on it with lack-lustre eye,
    Says very wisely, ‘It is ten o'clock…’
  • * 1605 , , Remaines Concerning Brittaine'', 1629 edition, ''Proverbes , page 276:
  • When the Pig is proffered, hold vp the poke .
  • * 1627 , , Minor Poems of Michael Drayton'', 1907 edition, poem ''Nimphidia :
  • And suddainly vntyes the Poke ,
    Which out of it sent such a smoke,
    As ready was them all to choke,
    So greeuous was the pother [...].
  • * 1814 , September 4, The Examiner'', volume 13, number 349, article ''French Fashions , page 573:
  • … and as to shape , a nightmare has as much. Under the poke and the muff-box, the face sometimes entirely disappears …
  • * 1946 , Mezz Mezzrow and Bernard Wolfe, Really the Blues , Payback Press 1999, p. 91:
  • In the summertime they'd reach out and snatch your straw hat right off your head, and if you were fool enough to go after it your poke was bound to be lighter when you came out.
  • * 2008 , (James Kelman), Kieron Smith, Boy , Penguin 2009, p. 138:
  • She did not eat blood-oranges. Her maw gived her one in a poke and she was going to throw it in the bin, Oh it is all black.
  • A long, wide sleeve; a poke sleeve.
  • (Scotland, Northern Ireland) An ice cream cone.
  • Derived terms
    * buy a pig in a poke * pocket

    Etymology 3

    Either a shortening of, or from the same source as, (quod vide).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (dialectal) Pokeweed.
  • Synonyms

    * see the list at (pokeweed)