Indulgence vs Sabbatine - What's the difference?

indulgence | sabbatine |


As a noun indulgence

is the act of indulging.

As a verb indulgence

is (roman catholic church ) to provide with an indulgence.

As an adjective sabbatine is

of or relating to an indulgence granted to the carmelite order in 1322 which promised liberation from purgatory on the saturday after death.

indulgence

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • the act of indulging
  • * Hammond
  • They err, that through indulgence to others, or fondness to any sin in themselves, substitute for repentance anything less.
  • tolerance
  • catering to someone's every desire
  • something in which someone indulges
  • An indulgent act; favour granted; gratification.
  • * Rogers
  • If all these gracious indulgences are without any effect on us, we must perish in our own folly.
  • (Roman Catholicism) A pardon or release from the expectation of punishment in purgatory, after the sinner has been granted absolution.
  • * 2009 , (Diarmaid MacCulloch), A History of Christianity , Penguin 2010, p. 555:
  • To understand how indulgences were intended to work depends on linking together a number of assumptions about sin and the afterlife, each of which individually makes considerable sense.

    Verb

    (indulgenc)
  • (Roman Catholic Church ) to provide with an indulgence
  • sabbatine

    English

    (Sabbatine Privilege) (Carmelite order)

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Of or relating to an indulgence granted to the Carmelite order in 1322 which promised liberation from purgatory on the Saturday after death.