Host vs Sabaoth - What's the difference?

host | sabaoth |


As nouns the difference between host and sabaoth

is that host is autumn (season) while sabaoth is (religion|bible) hosts; armies.

host

English

Alternative forms

* hoast (obsolete)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) oste (French: . Used in English since 13th century.

Noun

(en noun)
  • One which receives or entertains a guest, socially, commercially, or officially.
  • * (and other bibliographic particulars) (Shakespeare)
  • Time is like a fashionable host , / That slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand.
  • One that provides a facility for an event.
  • A person or organization responsible for running an event.
  • A moderator or master of ceremonies for a performance.
  • (computing, Internet) A in a network.
  • (computing, Internet) Any computer attached to a network.
  • (biology) A cell or organism which harbors another organism or biological entity, usually a parasite.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , title= In the News , volume=101, issue=3, page=193, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts : rodents.}}
  • (evolutionism, genetics) An organism bearing certain genetic material.
  • Consecrated bread such as that used in the Christian ceremony of the Eucharist.
  • A paid male companion offering conversation and in some cases sex, as in certain types of bar in Japan.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To perform the role of a host.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , title= In the News , volume=101, issue=3, page=193, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola.}}
  • (obsolete) To lodge at an inn.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Where you shall host .
  • (computing, Internet) To run software made available to a remote user or process.
  • * 1987 May 7, Selden E. Ball, Jr., Re: Ethernet Terminal Concentrators'', comp.protocols.tcp-ip, ''Usenet
  • CMU/TEK TCP/IP software uses an excessive amount of cpu resources for terminal support both outbound, when accessing another system, and inbound, when the local system is hosting a session.

    See also

    * guest * event * master of ceremonies

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) hoste, from Middle (etyl) ), cognate with etymology 1.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A multitude of people arrayed as an army; used also in religious senses, as: Heavenly host (of angels)
  • * 1843 , (Thomas Carlyle), '', book 3, ch. X, ''Plugson of Undershot
  • Why, Plugson, even thy own host is all in mutiny: Cotton is conquered; but the ‘bare backs’ — are worse covered than ever!
  • * 2001 , Carlos Parada, Hesione 2 , Greek Mythology Link
  • the invading host that had sailed from Hellas in more than one thousand ships was of an unprecedented size.
  • A large number of items; a large inventory.
  • A host of parts for my Model A.
    Derived terms
    * heavenly host * Lord of Hosts

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) also oist, ost, from (etyl) hoiste, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Catholicism) The consecrated bread or wafer of the Eucharist.
  • See also

    * hostage

    sabaoth

    English

    Noun

    (wikipedia Sabaoth) (-)
  • (religion, Bible) hosts; armies