Rumble vs Mutter - What's the difference?

rumble | mutter | Synonyms |

Rumble is a synonym of mutter.


As nouns the difference between rumble and mutter

is that rumble is a low, heavy, continuous sound, such as that of thunder or a hungry stomach while mutter is a repressed or obscure utterance; an instance of muttering.

As verbs the difference between rumble and mutter

is that rumble is to make a low, heavy, continuous sound while mutter is to utter words, especially complaints or angry expressions, indistinctly or with a low voice and lips partly closed; to say under one's breath.

As a interjection rumble

is an onomatopoeia describing a rumbling noise.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

rumble

English

Alternative forms

* (dialectal)

Interjection

(en interjection)
  • An onomatopoeia describing a rumbling noise
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • A low, heavy, continuous sound, such as that of thunder or a hungry stomach.
  • The rumble from passing trucks made it hard to sleep at night.
  • (slang) A street fight or brawl.
  • A rotating cask or box in which small articles are smoothed or polished by friction against each other.
  • (dated) A seat for servants, behind the body of a carriage.
  • * Charles Dickens
  • Kit, well wrapped, was in the rumble behind.

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To make a low, heavy, continuous sound.
  • If I don't eat, my stomach will rumble .
    I could hear the thunder rumbling in the distance.
  • To discover deceitful or underhanded behaviour.
  • The police is going to rumble your hideout.
  • To move while making a rumbling noise.
  • The truck rumbled over the rough road.
  • (slang) To fight; to brawl.
  • To cause to pass through a rumble, or polishing machine.
  • (obsolete) To murmur; to ripple.
  • * Spenser
  • to rumble gently down with murmur soft

    Anagrams

    * *

    mutter

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A repressed or obscure utterance; an instance of muttering.
  • The prisoners were docile, and accepted their lot with barely a mutter .
  • (in Indian restaurants) peas
  • Derived terms

    * mutter paneer

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To utter words, especially complaints or angry expressions, indistinctly or with a low voice and lips partly closed; to say under one's breath.
  • You could hear the students mutter as they were served sodden spaghetti, yet again, in the cafeteria.
    The beggar muttered words of thanks, as passersby dropped coins in his cup.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=June 28 , author=Jamie Jackson , title=Wimbledon 2012: Lukas Rosol shocked by miracle win over Rafael Nadal , work=the Guardian citation , page= , passage=This set – the set of Rosol's life – was studded with aces and menacing ground-strokes that left Nadal an impotent spectator often muttering to himself and at the umpire regarding a perceived misdemeanour by his opponent.}}
  • To speak softly and incoherently, or with imperfect articulations.
  • The asylum inmate muttered some doggerel about chains and pains to himself, over and over.
  • * Dryden
  • Meantime your filthy foreigner will stare, / And mutter to himself.
  • To make a sound with a low, rumbling noise.
  • April could hear the delivery van's engine muttering in the driveway.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Thick lightnings flash, the muttering thunder rolls.

    Synonyms

    * (sense, speak under one's breath) growl, grumble, mumble * (speak incoherently) babble, mumble, murmur, ramble, stutter * (make a low sound) growl, putter, rumble * See also