Hucked vs Rucked - What's the difference?

hucked | rucked |


As verbs the difference between hucked and rucked

is that hucked is (huck) while rucked is (ruck).

hucked

English

Verb

(head)
  • (huck)

  • huck

    English

    Verb

  • (Ultimate Frisbee) To throw a long way
  • (informal) to throw or chuck
  • He was so angry he hucked the book at my face.
  • (mountain biking) To gain extra height from a jump by compressing the springs just before the take-off
  • Longer forks make the bike more cumbersome, but you will be able to huck off of more stuff.
    If you huck it (the take-off), you'll drop about 20 feet.
  • (mountain biking) To make a maneuver in a clumsy way.
  • (whitewater kayaking) To paddle off of a waterfall or to boof a big drop.
  • I hucked a sweet 25 foot waterfall on the Tomata River.
  • (dated) To haggle in trading.
  • (snowboarding, skiing) To throw oneself off a large jump or drop.
  • Dude go huck that cornice!

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Ultimate Frisbee) Long throw, generally at least half a field or more.
  • (skiing, snowboarding) a drop or jump off of a cliff or cornice
  • rucked

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (ruck)
  • Anagrams

    *

    ruck

    English

    (wikipedia ruck)

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) ruke

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A throng or crowd of people or things; a mass, a pack.
  • *1873 , (Anthony Trollope), Phineas Redux , Chapter 16:
  • *:Dandolo was constantly in the ditch, sometimes lying with his side against the bank, and had now been so hustled and driven that, had he been on the other side, he would have had no breath left to carry his rider, even in the ruck of the hunt.
  • *1914 , (Booth Tarkington), Penrod , Chapter 23:
  • *:At last, out of the ruck rose Verman, disfigured and maniacal. With a wild eye he looked about him for his trusty rake; but Penrod, in horror, had long since thrown the rake out into the yard.
  • (Australian Rules Football) Contesting a bounce or ball up; used appositionally in "ruck contest". Rucks also used collectively either of ruckmen or of ruckmen and ruck rovers, and occasionally used in place of "followers" (including rovers too).
  • (rugby union) The situation formed when a runner is brought to ground and one or more members of each side are engaged above the ball, trying to win possession of it; a loose scrum.
  • The common mass (of) people or things; the ordinary ranks.
  • *1874 , (Thomas Hardy), Far from the Madding Crowd :
  • *:"He is well born." "His being higher in learning and birth than the ruck o' soldiers is anything but a proof of his worth. It shows his course to be down'ard."
  • *1911 , (Saki), ‘Tobermory’, The Chronicles of Clovis :
  • *:‘Here and there among cats one comes across an outstanding superior intellect, just as one does among the ruck of human beings [...].’
  • See also

    * maul * scrum

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To act as a ruckman in a stoppage in Australian Rules football.
  • To contest the possession of the ball in a game of Rugby.
  • Etymology 2

    1780, from (etyl) . More at (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To crease or fold.
  • To become folded.
  • * 1917' ''"Will you come over now and try on your dress?" Ally asked, looking at her with wistful admiration. "I want to be sure the sleeves don't '''ruck up the same as they did yesterday."'' — Edith Wharton, ''Summer , Chapter 12.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • A crease, a wrinkle, a pucker, as on fabric.
  • Etymology 3

    Compare (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (UK, dialect, obsolete) To cower or huddle together; to squat; to sit, as a hen on eggs.
  • (Gower)
    (South)

    Etymology 4

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Drayton)