Rounds vs Patrol - What's the difference?

rounds | patrol |


As nouns the difference between rounds and patrol

is that rounds is while patrol is (military) a going of the rounds along the chain of sentinels and between the posts, by a guard, usually consisting of three or four men, to insure greater security from attacks on the outposts.

As verbs the difference between rounds and patrol

is that rounds is (round) while patrol is to go the rounds along a chain of sentinels; to traverse a police district or beat.

rounds

English

Proper noun

(en proper noun)
  • for a descendant of a round or fat person.
  • patrol

    English

    (Webster 1913)

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (obsolete)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) patrouille, from (etyl) patrouille, . Related to (l), (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (military) A going of the rounds along the chain of sentinels and between the posts, by a guard, usually consisting of three or four men, to insure greater security from attacks on the outposts.
  • (military) A movement, by a small body of troops beyond the line of outposts, to explore the country and gain intelligence of the enemy's whereabouts.
  • (military) The guard or men who go the rounds for observation; a detachment whose duty it is to patrol.
  • Any perambulation of a particular line or district to guard it; also, the men thus guarding; as, a customs patrol; a fire patrol.
  • * (rfdate) A. Hamilton:
  • In France there is an army of patrols to secure her fiscal regulations.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-24, volume=408, issue=8850, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Boots on the street , passage=Philadelphia’s foot-patrol' strategy was developed after a study in 2009 by criminologists from Temple University, which is in the 22nd district. A randomised trial overturned the conventional view that foot ' patrols make locals like the police more and fear crime less, but do not actually reduce crime. In targeted areas, violent crime decreased by 23%.}}
  • (Scouting) A unit of a troop, typically composed of around eight boys.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) patrouiller, from (etyl)

    Verb

    (patroll)
  • To go the rounds along a chain of sentinels; to traverse a police district or beat.
  • To go the rounds of, as a sentry, guard, or policeman; as, to patrol a frontier; to patrol a beat.
  • Anagrams

    *