Impish vs Roguish - What's the difference?

impish | roguish |


As adjectives the difference between impish and roguish

is that impish is mischievous; of or befitting an imp while roguish is unprincipled or unscrupulous.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

impish

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • mischievous; of or befitting an imp.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1897 , author=H. G. Wells , title=A Story of the Stone Age , chapter=1 citation , passage=Wild-eyed youngsters they were, with matted hair and little broad-nosed impish faces, covered (as some children are covered even nowadays) with a delicate down of hair.}}
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1942 , author=Virginia Woolf , title=The Death of the Moth, and other essays , chapter=20 citation , passage=But the antics of Mr. Moore, though impish and impudent, are, after all, so amusing and so graceful that the governess, it is said, sometimes hides behind a tree to watch.}}

    Synonyms

    * (naughtily or annoyingly playful): implike, mischievous, pixilated, prankish, puckish

    roguish

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • unprincipled or unscrupulous
  • mischievous and playful
  • * 1840 , The Novel Newspaper (volume 2, page 8)
  • "She'll be a match for poor little Cupid, with his tiny bow and arrow, I dare say," said Grace Fitzgerald, with a roguish eye.

    Derived terms

    * roguishly * roguishness