Rime vs Rie - What's the difference?

rime | rie |


As a noun rime

is .

As a verb rie is

.

rime

English

(wikipedia rime)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) rim, from Old English .

Noun

(-)
  • (meteorology, uncountable) ice formed by the rapid freezing of cold water droplets of fog onto a cold surface.
  • * De Quincey
  • The trees were now covered with rime .
  • (meteorology, uncountable) a coating or sheet of ice so formed.
  • (uncountable) a film or slimy coating.
  • Synonyms
    * (a deposition of ice) hoarfrost, frost
    Derived terms
    * rimy

    Verb

    (rim)
  • To freeze or congeal into hoarfrost.
  • Etymology 2

    (etyl) rime, from (etyl) . Influenced in meaning by (etyl) rime from the same Germanic source.

    Alternative forms

    * rhyme

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete, or, dialectal) Number.
  • rhyme
  • (Coleridge)
    (Landor)
  • (linguistics) the second part of a syllable, from the vowel on, as opposed to the onset
  • Usage notes
    In reading education, "rime" refers to the vowel and the letters that come after the vowels in a syllable. For example, sit, spit, and split all have the same rime (-it). Words that rhyme often share the same rime, such as rock and sock (-ock). However, words that rhyme do not always share the same rime, such as claim and fame (-aim and -ame). Additionally, words that share the same rime do not always rhyme, such as tough and though (-ough). Rhyme and rime are not interchangeable, although they often overlap.

    Verb

    (rim)
  • Etymology 3

    Uncertain.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A step of a ladder; a rung.
  • Etymology 4

    (etyl) (lena) rima.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A rent or long aperture; a chink; a fissure; a crack.
  • (Sir Thomas Browne)

    Anagrams

    * ----

    rie

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • (Holland)
    (Webster 1913) ----