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Recked vs Ricked - What's the difference?

recked | ricked |

As verbs the difference between recked and ricked

is that recked is (reck) while ricked is (rick).

recked

English

Verb

(head)
  • (reck)
  • Anagrams

    *

    reck

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (obsolete)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make account of; to care for; to heed; to regard; consider.
  • * Sir Philip Sidney
  • this son of mine not recking danger
  • * Burns
  • And may you better reck the rede / Than ever did the adviser.
  • * 1603 , William Shakespeare, "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark", Act 1, Scene 3:
  • Ophelia:
    Do not, as some ungracious pastors do,
    Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven,
    Whiles, like a puffed and reckless libertine,
    Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads,
    And recks not his own rede.
  • *
  • * 1922 , (James Joyce), Chapter 13
  • Little recked he perhaps for what she felt, that dull aching void in her heart sometimes, piercing to the core.
  • To care; to matter.
  • * 1822 , John E. Hall (ed.), The Port Folio , vol. XIV
  • Little thou reck'st [2] of this sad store!
    Would thou might never reck [1] them more!
  • * 1900 , , Villanelle of Marguerite's , lines 10-11
  • *:She knows us not, nor recks if she enthrall
  • *:With voice and eyes and fashion of her hair
  • To concern, to be important
  • It recks not!
  • * Milton
  • What recks it them?
  • (obsolete) To think.
  • Derived terms

    * (l) * reckless

    ricked

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (rick)
  • Anagrams

    * *

    rick

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) , Icelandic (m).

    Alternative forms

    *

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A stack, stook or pile of grain, straw, hay etc., especially as protected with thatching.
  • *(George Eliot) (1819-1880)
  • *:There is a remnant still of last year's golden clusters of beehive ricks , rising at intervals beyond the hedgerows;.
  • *
  • *:It was not far from the house; but the ground sank into a depression there, and the ridge of it behind shut out everything except just the roof of the tallest hayrick. As one sat on the sward behind the elm, with the back turned on the rick and nothing in front but the tall elms and the oaks in the other hedge, it was quite easy to fancy it the verge of the prairie with the backwoods close by.
  • (lb) A stack of wood, especially cut to a regular length; also used as a measure of wood, typically four by eight feet.
  • Derived terms
    * rickburner

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To heap up (hay, etc.) in ricks.
  • Etymology 2

    (etyl) wricke

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • slightly sprain or strain the neck, back, ankle etc.
  • Etymology 3

    Abbreviated form from recruit

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (military, pejorative, and, demeaning) A brand new (naive ) boot camp inductee.
  • No turning back now rick, you are property of the US government, no longer protected by the bill of rights; you follow the UCMJ now.