Articulate vs Rhetoric - What's the difference?

articulate | rhetoric |


As adjectives the difference between articulate and rhetoric

is that articulate is clear, effective while rhetoric is .

As nouns the difference between articulate and rhetoric

is that articulate is (label) an animal of the subkingdom articulata while rhetoric is the art of using language, especially public speaking, as a means to persuade.

As a verb articulate

is to make clear or effective.

articulate

English

(Articulation)

Etymology 1

.

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • clear, effective
  • especially, speaking in a clear or effective manner
  • able to bend or hinge at certain points or intervals
  • Expressed in articles or in separate items or particulars.
  • (Francis Bacon)
  • Related to human speech, as distinct from the vocalisation of animals.
  • * 1728 , James Knapton and John Knapton, Cyclopaedia, or an Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences , page 146:
  • Brutes cannot form articulate'' Sounds, cannot ''articulate the Sounds of the Voice, excepting some few Birds, as the Parrot, Pye, &c.
    Synonyms
    * (good at speaking) eloquent, well-spoken

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (label) An animal of the subkingdom Articulata.
  • Etymology 2

    From the adjective.

    Verb

    (articulat)
  • To make clear or effective.
  • To speak clearly; to enunciate.
  • I wish he’d articulate his words more clearly.
  • To explain; to put into words; to make something specific.
  • I like this painting, but I can’t articulate why.
  • To bend or hinge something at intervals, or to allow or build something so that it can bend.
  • an articulated bus
  • (music) to attack a note, as by tonguing, slurring, bowing, etc.
  • Articulate that passage heavily.
  • (anatomy) to form a joint or connect by joints
  • The lower jaw articulates with the skull at the temporomandibular joint.
  • (obsolete) To treat or make terms.
  • (Shakespeare)
    Derived terms
    *

    rhetoric

    Alternative forms

    * rhetorick (obsolete)

    Adjective

  • Noun

  • The art of using language, especially public speaking, as a means to persuade.
  • Meaningless language with an exaggerated style intended to impress.
  • It’s only so much rhetoric .

    Usage notes

    * Adjectives often applied to "rhetoric": political, legal, visual, classical, ancient, violent, empty, inflammatory, hateful, heated, fiery, vitriolic, angry, overheated, extreme.

    Synonyms

    * (l)

    Derived terms

    * rhetorical * rhetorician

    See also

    * preterition *

    Anagrams

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