Prune vs Retrench - What's the difference?

prune | retrench |


As verbs the difference between prune and retrench

is that prune is to remove excess material from a tree or shrub; to trim, especially to make more healthy or productive while retrench is to cut down or reduce or retrench can be to dig or redig a trench where one already was.

As a noun prune

is (obsolete) a plum.

prune

English

(wikipedia prune)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) prune, from (etyl) , a loanword from a language of Asia Minor.

Noun

(en noun)
  • (obsolete) A plum.
  • The dried, wrinkled fruit of certain species of plum.
  • (slang) An old woman, especially a wrinkly one.
  • Synonyms
    * see
    Derived terms
    * German prune * prune tree * pruney * South African prune

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) 'to round-off the front'.

    Verb

    (prun)
  • To remove excess material from a tree or shrub; to trim, especially to make more healthy or productive.
  • A good grape grower will prune his vines once a year.
  • * Milton
  • Our delightful task / To prune these growing plants, and tend these flowers.
  • (figuratively) To cut down or shorten (by the removal of unnecessary material).
  • to prune a budget, or an essay
  • * Francis Bacon
  • taking into consideration how they [laws] are to be pruned and reformed
  • (obsolete) To preen; to prepare; to dress.
  • * Shakespeare
  • His royal bird / Prunes the immortal wing and cloys his beak.
    (Dryden)
    (Spenser)
    Derived terms
    * (l) * (l)

    Anagrams

    * ----

    retrench

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) retrenchier, (etyl) retrancher; see (etyl) , and English trench.

    Verb

    (es)
  • To cut down or reduce.
  • * Denham
  • Thy exuberant parts retrench .
  • To abridge; to curtail.
  • * Milton
  • But this thy glory shall be soon retrenched .
  • To confine; to limit; to restrict.
  • (Addison)
  • * I. Taylor
  • These figures, ought they then to receive a retrenched interpretation?
  • To furnish with a retrenchment (defensive work within a fortification).
  • to retrench bastions
  • To take up a new defensive position.
  • We must retrench and try to hold on long enough for products in development to reach the market or we will be out of business.
  • *2012 , The Economist, Private Equity: Keep Calm and Carry On
  • International firms could decide it is not cost-effective to keep open their other European offices and retrench to London.

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (es)
  • To dig or redig a trench where one already was.
  • Anagrams

    *