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Process vs Result - What's the difference?

process | result |

In lang=en terms the difference between process and result

is that process is the act of serving a defendant with a summons or a writ while result is to return to the proprietor (or heirs) after a reversion.

As nouns the difference between process and result

is that process is a series of events to produce a result, especially as contrasted to product while result is that which results; the conclusion or end to which any course or condition of things leads, or which is obtained by any process or operation; consequence or effect.

As verbs the difference between process and result

is that process is to perform a particular process while result is to proceed, spring or rise, as a consequence, from facts, arguments, premises, combination of circumstances, consultation, thought or endeavor.

As an interjection result is

an exclamation of joy following a favorable outcome.

process

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl)

Noun

(es)
  • A series of events to produce a result, especially as contrasted to product.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 27, author=Alistair Magowan, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Bayern Munich 2-0 Man City , passage=But they came up against an impressive force in Bayern, who extended their run to 10 wins on the trot, having scored 28 goals in the process and conceding none.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=68, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= T time , passage=Yet in “Through a Latte, Darkly”, a new study of how Starbucks has largely avoided paying tax in Britain, Edward Kleinbard […] shows that current tax rules make it easy for all sorts of firms to generate what he calls “stateless income”: […]. In Starbucks’s case, the firm has in effect turned the process of making an expensive cup of coffee into intellectual property.}}
    This product of last month's quality standards committee is quite good, even though the process was flawed.
  • (legal) The act of serving a defendant with a summons or a writ.
  • (biology) An outgrowth of tissue or cell.
  • (anatomy) A structure that arises above a surface.
  • (computing) A task or program that is or was executing.
  • (manufacturing) A set of procedures used to produce a product, most commonly in the food and chemical industries.
  • * 1960', Mack Tyner, '''''Process''' Engineering Calculations: Material and Energy Balances'' - Ordinarily a '''process''' plant will use a steam boiler to supply its ' process heat requirements and to drive a steam-turbine generator.
  • * 1987', J. R. Richards, ''Principles of control system design'' in ''Modelling and control of fermentation '''process'''es'' - The words ''plant'' or '''''process''''' infer generally any dynamic system, be it primarily mechanical, electrical, or chemical ' process in nature, and may extend also to include social or economic systems.
  • A path of succession of states through which a system passes.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2012-01
  • , author=Robert L. Dorit , title=Rereading Darwin , volume=100, issue=1, page=23 , magazine= citation , passage=We live our lives in three dimensions for our threescore and ten allotted years. Yet every branch of contemporary science, from statistics to cosmology, alludes to processes that operate on scales outside of human experience: the millisecond and the nanometer, the eon and the light-year.}}
  • (lb) Successive physiological responses to keep or restore health.
  • Derived terms
    * due process * due process of law * due-process * process color, process colour * process hot water * process server * process upset

    Verb

    (es)
  • To perform a particular process.
  • We have processed the data using our proven techniques, and have come to the following conclusions.
  • To treat with a substance
  • To think an information over, or a concept, in order to assimilate it, and perhaps accept it as valid.
  • Etymology 2

    Verb

    (es)
  • (mostly British) To walk in a procession.
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    result

    English

    Verb

    (en verb) (intransitive)
  • To proceed, spring or rise, as a consequence, from facts, arguments, premises, combination of circumstances, consultation, thought or endeavor.
  • * Tillotson
  • Pleasure and peace do naturally result from a holy and good life.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=October 23, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Man Utd 1-6 Man City , passage=United's hopes of mounting a serious response suffered a blow within two minutes of the restart when Evans, who had endured a miserable afternoon, lost concentration and allowed Balotelli to steal in behind him. The defender's only reaction was to haul the Italian down, resulting in an inevitable red card.}}
  • To come out, or have an issue; to terminate; to have consequences; followed by in .
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katrina G. Claw
  • , title= Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=In plants, the ability to recognize self from nonself plays an important role in fertilization, because self-fertilization will result in less diverse offspring than fertilization with pollen from another individual.}}
  • (legal) To return to the proprietor (or heirs) after a reversion.
  • (obsolete) To leap back; to rebound.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • the huge round stone, resulting with a bound

    Synonyms

    * follow, arise

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • That which results; the conclusion or end to which any course or condition of things leads, or which is obtained by any process or operation; consequence or effect.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=No hiding place
  • , date=2013-05-25, volume=407, issue=8837, page=74, magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=In America alone, people spent $170 billion on “direct marketing”—junk mail of both the physical and electronic varieties—last year. Yet of those who received unsolicited adverts through the post, only 3% bought anything as a result . If the bumf arrived electronically, the take-up rate was 0.1%. And for online adverts the “conversion” into sales was a minuscule 0.01%.}}
  • The fruit, beneficial or tangible effect(s) achieved by effort.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=1 , passage=The stories did not seem to me to touch life. They were plainly intended to have a bracing moral effect, and perhaps had this result for the people at whom they were aimed.}}
  • The decision or determination of a council or deliberative assembly; a resolve; a decree.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • Then of their session ended they bid cry / With trumpet's regal sound the great result .
  • (label) A flying back; resilience.
  • * (Francis Bacon) (1561-1626)
  • Sound is produced between the string and the air by the return or the result of the string.
  • (label) The final score in a game.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1935, author= George Goodchild
  • , title=Death on the Centre Court, chapter=3 , passage=It had been his intention to go to Wimbledon, but as he himself said: “Why be blooming well frizzled when you can hear all the results' over the wireless. And ' results are all that concern me. […]”}}
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 24, author=David Ornstein, title=Arsenal 3 - 0 Bolton
  • , work=BBC Sport citation , passage=The Gunners boss has been heavily criticised for his side's poor start to the Premier League season but this result helps lift the pressure.}}
  • (label) A positive or favourable outcome for someone.
  • Derived terms

    * as a result * resultful * resultless

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (UK) An exclamation of joy following a favorable outcome.
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • * 2010 April 10, Amy Pond, in The Beast Below (series 5, episode 2), written by Steven Moffat:
  • (picking a lock) I wonder what I did...
    (the lock opens) Hey hey, result !

    Statistics

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