Answer vs Result - What's the difference?

answer | result |


In legal|lang=en terms the difference between answer and result

is that answer is (legal) to file a document in response to a complaint while result is (legal) to return to the proprietor (or heirs) after a reversion.

In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between answer and result

is that answer is (obsolete) to be or act as an equivalent to, or as adequate or sufficient for; to serve for; to repay while result is (obsolete) to leap back; to rebound.

As nouns the difference between answer and result

is that answer is a response or reply; something said]] or [[do|done in reaction to a statement or question while result is that which results; the conclusion or end to which any course or condition of things leads, or which is obtained by any process or operation; consequence or effect.

As verbs the difference between answer and result

is that answer is (ambitransitive) to make a reply or response to while result is to proceed, spring or rise, as a consequence, from facts, arguments, premises, combination of circumstances, consultation, thought or endeavor.

As an interjection result is

(uk) an exclamation of joy following a favorable outcome.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

answer

English

(wikipedia answer)

Alternative forms

* (both obsolete)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), andsware, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A response or reply; something said]] or [[do, done in reaction to a statement or question.
  • Her answer to his proposal was a slap in the face .
  • A solution to a problem.
  • There is no simple answer to corruption.
  • (legal) A document filed in response to a complaint, responding to each point raised in the complaint and raising counterpoints.
  • Derived terms
    () * answerless * answer on a postcard * answerphone * answer print

    See also

    * ask

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) answeren, andswaren, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (ambitransitive) To make a reply or response to.
  • * Bible, 1 Kings xviii. 26
  • There was no voice, nor any that answered .
  • * Shakespeare
  • She answers him as if she knew his mind.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=“Well,” I answered , at first with uncertainty, then with inspiration, “he would do splendidly to lead your cotillon, if you think of having one.” ¶ “So you do not dance, Mr. Crocker?” ¶ I was somewhat set back by her perspicuity.}}
  • To speak in defence against; to reply to in defence.
  • to answer a charge or accusation
  • (ambitransitive) To respond to a call by someone at a door or telephone, or other similar piece of equipment.
  • Nobody answered when I knocked on the door.
  • To suit a need or purpose satisfactorily.
  • * Alexander Ellis
  • Of course for publication in a newspaper, my palaeotype would not answer , but my glossotype would enable the author to give his Pennsylvania German in an English form and much more intelligibly.
  • * 1903 , , (The Way of All Flesh) , Ch. 41
  • Theobald spoke as if watches had half-a-dozen purposes besides time-keeping, but he could hardly open his mouth without using one or other of his tags, and "answering every purpose" was one of them.
  • To be accountable or responsible; to make amends.
  • The man must answer to his employer for the money entrusted to his care.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Let his neck answer for it, if there is any martial law.
  • (legal) To file a document in response to a complaint.
  • To correspond to; to be in harmony with; to be in agreement with.
  • * 1775 , (Richard Brinsley Sheridan), (The Duenna) , Act 2, Scene 2
  • I wish she had answered her picture as well.
  • * B. Edwards
  • The use of dunder in the making of rum answers the purpose of yeast in the fermentation of flour.
  • To be opposite, or to act in opposition.
  • * Gilpin
  • The windows answering each other, we could just discern the glowing horizon through them.
  • To be or act in conformity, or by way of accommodation, correspondence, relation, or proportion; to conform; to correspond; to suit; usually with to .
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • Weapons must needs be dangerous things, if they answered the bulk of so prodigious a person.
  • * Shakespeare
  • That the time may have all shadow and silence in it, and the place answer to convenience.
  • * Shakespeare
  • If this but answer to my just belief, / I'll remember you.
  • * Bible, Proverbs xxvii. 19
  • As in water face answereth to face, so the heart of man to man.
  • To respond to satisfactorily; to meet successfully by way of explanation, argument, or justification; to refute.
  • * Bible, Matt. xxii. 46
  • No man was able to answer him a word.
  • * Milton
  • These shifts refuted, answer thine appellant.
  • * Macaulay
  • The reasoning was not and could not be answered .
  • To be or act in compliance with, in fulfillment or satisfaction of, as an order, obligation, or demand.
  • He answered my claim upon him.
    The servant answered the bell.
  • * Shakespeare
  • This proud king studies day and night / To answer all the debts he owes unto you.
  • (obsolete) To render account to or for.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I will send him to answer thee.
  • (obsolete) To atone; to be punished for.
  • * Shakespeare
  • And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
  • (obsolete) To be or act as an equivalent to, or as adequate or sufficient for; to serve for; to repay.
  • * Bible, Eccles. x. 19
  • Money answereth all things.
    Derived terms
    () * answerable * answer at * answer back * answerer * answer for * answer the call of nature * answer the helm * answer to

    See also

    * question

    result

    English

    Verb

    (en verb) (intransitive)
  • To proceed, spring or rise, as a consequence, from facts, arguments, premises, combination of circumstances, consultation, thought or endeavor.
  • * Tillotson
  • Pleasure and peace do naturally result from a holy and good life.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=October 23, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Man Utd 1-6 Man City , passage=United's hopes of mounting a serious response suffered a blow within two minutes of the restart when Evans, who had endured a miserable afternoon, lost concentration and allowed Balotelli to steal in behind him. The defender's only reaction was to haul the Italian down, resulting in an inevitable red card.}}
  • To come out, or have an issue; to terminate; to have consequences; followed by in .
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katrina G. Claw
  • , title= Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=In plants, the ability to recognize self from nonself plays an important role in fertilization, because self-fertilization will result in less diverse offspring than fertilization with pollen from another individual.}}
  • (legal) To return to the proprietor (or heirs) after a reversion.
  • (obsolete) To leap back; to rebound.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • the huge round stone, resulting with a bound

    Synonyms

    * follow, arise

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • That which results; the conclusion or end to which any course or condition of things leads, or which is obtained by any process or operation; consequence or effect.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=No hiding place
  • , date=2013-05-25, volume=407, issue=8837, page=74, magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=In America alone, people spent $170 billion on “direct marketing”—junk mail of both the physical and electronic varieties—last year. Yet of those who received unsolicited adverts through the post, only 3% bought anything as a result . If the bumf arrived electronically, the take-up rate was 0.1%. And for online adverts the “conversion” into sales was a minuscule 0.01%.}}
  • The fruit, beneficial or tangible effect(s) achieved by effort.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=1 , passage=The stories did not seem to me to touch life. They were plainly intended to have a bracing moral effect, and perhaps had this result for the people at whom they were aimed.}}
  • The decision or determination of a council or deliberative assembly; a resolve; a decree.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • Then of their session ended they bid cry / With trumpet's regal sound the great result .
  • (label) A flying back; resilience.
  • * (Francis Bacon) (1561-1626)
  • Sound is produced between the string and the air by the return or the result of the string.
  • (label) The final score in a game.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1935, author= George Goodchild
  • , title=Death on the Centre Court, chapter=3 , passage=It had been his intention to go to Wimbledon, but as he himself said: “Why be blooming well frizzled when you can hear all the results' over the wireless. And ' results are all that concern me. […]”}}
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 24, author=David Ornstein, title=Arsenal 3 - 0 Bolton
  • , work=BBC Sport citation , passage=The Gunners boss has been heavily criticised for his side's poor start to the Premier League season but this result helps lift the pressure.}}
  • (label) A positive or favourable outcome for someone.
  • Derived terms

    * as a result * resultful * resultless

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (UK) An exclamation of joy following a favorable outcome.
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • * 2010 April 10, Amy Pond, in The Beast Below (series 5, episode 2), written by Steven Moffat:
  • (picking a lock) I wonder what I did...
    (the lock opens) Hey hey, result !

    Statistics

    *