Rest vs Change - What's the difference?

rest | change |


In context|countable|lang=en terms the difference between rest and change

is that rest is (countable) any object designed to be used to support something else while change is (countable) a transfer between vehicles.

In context|uncountable|lang=en terms the difference between rest and change

is that rest is (uncountable) peace; freedom from worry, anxiety, annoyances; tranquility while change is (uncountable) money given back when a customer hands over more than the exact price of an item.

As nouns the difference between rest and change

is that rest is (uncountable|of a person or animal) relief from work or activity by sleeping; sleep or rest can be (label) that which remains while change is (countable) the process of becoming different.

As verbs the difference between rest and change

is that rest is to cease from action, motion, work, or performance of any kind; stop; desist; be without motion or rest can be (obsolete) to remain or rest can be (obsolete) to arrest while change is to become something different.

rest

English

(wikipedia rest)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) (m), . Related to (l).

Noun

  • (uncountable, of a person or animal) Relief from work or activity by sleeping; sleep.
  • I need to get a good rest tonight; I was up late last night.
    The sun sets, and the workers go to their rest .
  • (countable) Any relief from exertion; a state of quiet and relaxation.
  • We took a rest at the top of the hill to get our breath back.
  • (uncountable) Peace; freedom from worry, anxiety, annoyances; tranquility.
  • It was nice to have a rest from the phone ringing when I unplugged it for a while.
  • * Bible, Judges iii. 30
  • And the land had rest fourscore years.
  • (uncountable, of an object or concept) A state of inactivity; a state of little or no motion; a state of completion.
  • The boulder came to rest just behind the house after rolling down the mountain.
    The ocean was finally at rest .
    Now that we're all in agreement, we can put that issue to rest .
  • (euphemistic, uncountable) A final position after death.
  • She was laid to rest in the village cemetery.
  • (music, countable) A pause of a specified length in a piece of music.
  • Remember there's a rest at the end of the fourth bar.
  • (music, countable) A written symbol indicating such a pause in a musical score such as in sheet music.
  • (physics, uncountable) Absence of motion.
  • The body's centre of gravity may affect its state of rest .
  • (snooker, countable) A stick with a U-, V- or X-shaped head used to support the tip of a cue when the cue ball is otherwise out of reach.
  • Higgins can't quite reach the white with his cue, so he'll be using the rest .
  • (countable) Any object designed to be used to support something else.
  • She put the phone receiver back in its rest .
    He placed his hands on the arm rests of the chair.
  • A projection from the right side of the cuirass of armour, serving to support the lance.
  • * Dryden
  • their visors closed, their lances in the rest
  • A place where one may rest, either temporarily, as in an inn, or permanently, as, in an abode.
  • * J. H. Newman
  • halfway houses and travellers' rests
  • * Milton
  • in dust our final rest , and native home
  • * Bible, Deuteronomy xii. 9
  • Ye are not as yet come to the rest and to the inheritance which the Lord your God giveth you.
  • (poetry) A short pause in reading poetry; a caesura.
  • The striking of a balance at regular intervals in a running account.
  • * Abbott
  • An account is said to be taken with annual or semiannual rests .
  • (dated) A set or game at tennis.
  • Synonyms
    * (sleep) sleep, slumber * (relief from exertion) break, repose, time off * (freedom from trouble) peace, quiet, roo, silence, stillness, tranquility * (repose afforded by death) peace * (object designed to be used to support something else) cradle (of a telephone ), support
    Antonyms
    * motion * activity
    Hypernyms
    * bridge
    Hyponyms
    * (object designed to be used to support something else) arm rest, elbow rest, foot rest, head rest, leg rest, neck rest, wrist rest * (pause of specified length in a piece of music) breve rest, demisemiquaver rest, hemidemisemiquaver rest, minim rest, quaver rest, semibreve rest, semiquaver rest
    Derived terms
    * arm rest * at rest * bed rest * breve rest * chin rest * crotchet rest * day of rest * demisemiquaver rest * elbow rest * foot rest * gun rest * head rest * hemidemisemiquaver rest * incisal rest * lay to rest * leg rest * minim rest * neck rest * parade rest * put to rest * quarter rest * quaver rest * rest area * rest day * rest energy * rest home * rest mass * rest period * rest position * rest stop * restful * restless * restroom * semibreve rest * semiquaver rest * tool rest/tool-rest * whole rest * wolffian rest * wrist rest

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cease from action, motion, work, or performance of any kind; stop; desist; be without motion.
  • * Bible, Exodus xxiii. 12
  • Six days thou shalt do thy work, and on the seventh day thou shalt rest .
  • To come to a pause or an end; end.
  • To be free from that which harasses or disturbs; be quiet or still; be undisturbed.
  • * Milton
  • There rest , if any rest can harbour there.
  • (intransitive, transitive, reflexive) To be or to put into a state of rest.
  • * 1485 , Sir (Thomas Malory), (w, Le Morte d'Arthur) , Book X:
  • And thereby at a pryory they rested them all nyght.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 29, author=Jon Smith, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Tottenham 3-1 Shamrock Rovers , passage=With the north London derby to come at the weekend, Spurs boss Harry Redknapp opted to rest many of his key players, although he brought back Aaron Lennon after a month out through injury.}}
  • To stay, remain, be situated.
  • (transitive, intransitive, reflexive) To lean, lie, or lay.
  • A column rests on its pedestal.
  • (intransitive, transitive, legal, US) To complete one's active advocacy in a trial or other proceeding, and thus to wait for the outcome (however, one is still generally available to answer questions, etc.)
  • To sleep; slumber.
  • To lie dormant.
  • To sleep the final sleep; sleep in death; die; be dead.
  • To rely or depend on.
  • * Dryden
  • On him I rested , after long debate, / And not without considering, fixed fate.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Boundary problems , passage=Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too.
  • To be satisfied; to acquiesce.
  • * Addison
  • to rest in Heaven's determination
    Synonyms
    * relax * (give rest to) relieve * (stop working) have a breather, pause, take a break, take time off, take time out * (be situated) be, lie, remain, reside, stay * lay, lean, place, put * lean, lie
    Troponyms
    * (lie down and take repose) sleep, nap
    Derived terms
    * rest assured * rest in peace/RIP * rest on one's laurels

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) (m) from (etyl) ).

    Noun

    (-)
  • (label) That which remains.
  • Those not included in a proposition or description; the remainder; others.
  • * (w) (1635–1699)
  • Plato and the rest of the philosophers
  • * (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • Armed like the rest , the Trojan prince appears.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=11 , passage=The rest of us were engaged in various occupations: Mr. Trevor relating experiences of steamboat days on the Ohio to Mrs. Cooke; Miss Trevor buried in a serial in the Century; and Farrar and I taking an inventory of the fishing-tackle, when we were startled by a loud and profane ejaculation.}}
  • A surplus held as a reserved fund by a bank to equalize its dividends, etc.; in the (Bank of England), the balance of assets above liabilities.
  • Synonyms
    * remainder * lave
    Derived terms
    * all the rest

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To remain.
  • Etymology 4

    Aphetic form of (m).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To arrest.
  • Statistics

    *

    change

    English

    Verb

    (chang)
  • To become something different.
  • (ergative) To make something into something different.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=The climate of Tibet: Pole-land
  • , date=2013-05-11, volume=407, issue=8835, page=80 , magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=Of all the transitions brought about on the Earth’s surface by temperature change, the melting of ice into water is the starkest. It is binary. And for the land beneath, the air above and the life around, it changes everything.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Catherine Clabby
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= Focus on Everything , passage=Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus.
  • To replace.
  • To replace one's clothing.
  • To transfer to another vehicle (train, bus, etc.)
  • (archaic) To exchange.
  • * 1610 , , by (William Shakespeare), act 1 scene 2
  • At the first sight / they have changed eyes. (exchanged looks )
  • * 1662 , Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (Dialogue 2):
  • I would give any thing to change a word or two with this person.
  • To change hand while riding (a horse).
  • to change a horse

    Synonyms

    * (to make something different) alter, modify * (to make something into something different) transform

    Derived terms

    * changeable * change by reversal * change course * change direction * changeful * change out * change hands * change horses in midstream * change integrity * changeling * change one's mind * change one's tune * change places * change tack * change the channel * change the subject * change up * chop and change * everchanging * get changed * leopard change his spots * presto change-o *

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable) The process of becoming different.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=The climate of Tibet: Pole-land
  • , date=2013-05-11, volume=407, issue=8835, page=80 , magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=Of all the transitions brought about on the Earth’s surface by temperature change , the melting of ice into water is the starkest. It is binary. And for the land beneath, the air above and the life around, it changes everything.}}
    The product is undergoing a change in order to improve it.
  • (uncountable) Small denominations of money given in exchange for a larger denomination.
  • Can I get change for this $100 bill please?
  • (countable) A replacement, e.g. a change of clothes
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Mark Vesty , title=Wigan 2 - 2 Arsenal , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=After beating champions Chelsea 3-1 on Boxing Day, Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger made eight changes to his starting XI in an effort to freshen things up, with games against Birmingham and Manchester City to come in the next seven days.}}
  • (uncountable) Money given back when a customer hands over more than the exact price of an item.
  • A customer who pays with a 10-pound note for a £9 item receives one pound in change .
  • (countable) A transfer between vehicles.
  • The train journey from Bristol to Nottingham includes a change at Birmingham.
  • (baseball) A change-up pitch.
  • (lb) Any order in which a number of bells are struck, other than that of the diatonic scale.
  • * Holder
  • Four bells admit twenty-four changes in ringing.
  • A place where merchants and others meet to transact business; an exchange.
  • A public house; an alehouse.
  • * Burt
  • They call an alehouse a change .

    Usage notes

    * Adjectives often applied to "change": big, small, major, minor, dramatic, drastic, rapid, slow, gradual, radical, evolutionary, revolutionary, abrupt, sudden, unexpected, incremental, social, economic, organizational, technological, personal, cultural, political, technical, environmental, institutional, educational, genetic, physical, chemical, industrial, geological, global, local, good, bad, positive, negative, significant, important, structural, strategic, tactical.

    Synonyms

    (the process of becoming different) transition, transformation

    Derived terms

    * and change * breaking change * bureau de change * chump change * cool change * change agent * change key * change-off * change of heart * change of innings * change of life * change of mind * change of state * change order * change ringing * change-up * chemical change * chump change * climate change * deflection change * fatty change * net change * oil change * phase change * quick-change * regime change * sea change * seed change * sex change * shortchange * small change * sound change * spare change * step change * technological change * the change

    See also

    * modification * mutation * evolution * exchange * reorganization

    References

    *