Repair vs Mend - What's the difference?

repair | mend |


As nouns the difference between repair and mend

is that repair is the act of repairing something or repair can be an act of going on vacation while mend is a place, as in clothing, which has been repaired by mending.

As verbs the difference between repair and mend

is that repair is to restore to good working order, fix, or improve damaged condition; to mend; to remedy or repair can be to transfer oneself to another place or repair can be to pair again while mend is to repair, as anything that is torn, broken, defaced, decayed, or the like; to restore from partial decay, injury, or defacement; to patch up; to put in shape or order again; to re-create; as, to mend a garment or a machine.

repair

English

Etymology 1

Coined between 1300 and 1350 from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • The act of repairing something.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-14, volume=411, issue=8891, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= It's a gas , passage=One of the hidden glories of Victorian engineering is proper drains.
  • The result of repairing something.
  • The condition of something, in respect of need for repair.
  • Derived terms
    * disrepair

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To restore to good working order, fix, or improve damaged condition; to mend; to remedy.
  • to repair a house, a road, a shoe, or a ship
    to repair a shattered fortune
  • * Milton
  • secret refreshings that repair his strength
  • * Wordsworth
  • Do thou, as thou art wont, repair / My heart with gladness.
  • To make amends for, as for an injury, by an equivalent; to indemnify for.
  • to repair a loss or damage
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll repair the misery thou dost bear.
    Synonyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * repairable / reparable, repairer

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) . Cognate to repatriate.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of repairing or resorting to a place.
  • our annual repair to the mountains
  • * Clarendon
  • The king sent a proclamation for their repair to their houses.
  • A place to which one goes frequently or habitually; a haunt.
  • * Dryden
  • There the fierce winds his tender force assail / And beat him downward to his first repair .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To transfer oneself to another place.
  • :
  • *(Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • *:Go, mount the winds, and to the shades repair .
  • *1850 , , (Jane Eyre)
  • *:I heard the visitors repair to their chambers.
  • *
  • *:That finished, I repaired to my room, one flight up, and, after a thorough wash, seated myself, pipe in mouth, at the little window that opened on the Rue Garde. I had nothing more exciting on hand than to wait for word from Von Lindowe. I sincerely hoped that it would not be long, for it is not my forte to sit twiddling my thumbs.
  • Derived terms
    * repatriate

    Etymology 3

    From .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to pair again
  • mend

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A place, as in clothing, which has been repaired by mending.
  • The act of repairing.
  • My trousers have a big rip in them and need a mend .

    Derived terms

    * on the mend

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To repair, as anything that is torn, broken, defaced, decayed, or the like; to restore from partial decay, injury, or defacement; to patch up; to put in shape or order again; to re-create; as, to mend a garment or a machine.
  • My trousers have a big rip in them and need mending .
    When your car breaks down, you can take it to the garage to have it mended .
  • To alter for the better; to set right; to reform; hence, to quicken; as, to mend one's manners or pace.
  • Her stutter was mended by a speech therapist.
    My broken heart was mended .
  • * Sir W. Temple
  • The best service they could do the state was to mend the lives of the persons who composed it.
  • To help, to advance, to further; to add to.
  • * Mortimer
  • Though in some lands the grass is but short, yet it mends garden herbs and fruit.
  • * Shakespeare
  • You mend the jewel by wearing it.
  • To grow better; to advance to a better state; to become improved.
  • Derived terms

    * mend one's pace
    Synonyms
    * See also