Tendest vs Rendest - What's the difference?

tendest | rendest |


In archaic|lang=en terms the difference between tendest and rendest

is that tendest is (archaic) (tend) while rendest is (archaic) (rend).

As verbs the difference between tendest and rendest

is that tendest is (archaic) (tend) while rendest is (archaic) (rend).

tendest

English

Verb

(head)
  • (archaic) (tend)

  • tend

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) tenden, from (etyl) . Related to (l).

    Alternative forms

    * (l), (l), (l), (l), (l) * (l), (l), (l), (l) (Scotland)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To kindle; ignite; set on fire; light; inflame; burn.
  • Derived terms
    * (l), (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) *.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (legal, Old English law) To make a tender of; to offer or tender.
  • (followed by a to infinitive) To be likely, or probable to do something, or to have a certain characteristic.
  • They tend to go out on Saturdays.
    It tends to snow here in winter.
    Usage notes
    * In sense 2. this is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive. * See
    Derived terms
    * tendency

    See also

    * be given to

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) . More at (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (with to) To look after (e.g. an ill person.)
  • We need to tend to the garden, which has become a mess.
  • To accompany as an assistant or protector; to care for the wants of; to look after; to watch; to guard.
  • Shepherds tend their flocks.
  • * Emerson
  • There's not a sparrow or a wren, / There's not a blade of autumn grain, / Which the four seasons do not tend / And tides of life and increase lend.
  • To wait (upon), as attendants or servants; to serve; to attend.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Was he not companion with the riotous knights / That tend upon my father?
  • (obsolete) To await; to expect.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) To be attentive to; to note carefully; to attend to.
  • * Chapman
  • Being to descend / A ladder much in height, I did not tend / My way well down.
  • (nautical) To manage (an anchored vessel) when the tide turns, to prevent it from entangling the cable when swinging.
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    rendest

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (archaic) (rend)

  • rend

    English

    Verb

  • To separate into parts with force or sudden violence; to tear asunder; to split; to burst
  • Powder rends a rock in blasting.
    Lightning rends an oak.
  • * 1610 , , act 1 scene 2
  • If thou more murmur'st, I will rend an oak / And peg thee in his knotty entrails till / Thou hast howl'd away twelve winters.
  • * 1970 , Alvin Toffler, Future Shock'', ''Bantam Books , pg. 317:
  • We are most vulnerable now to the messages of the new subcults, to the claims and counterclaims that rend the air.
  • To part or tear off forcibly; to take away by force.
  • To be rent or torn; to become parted; to separate; to split.
  • Relationships may rend if tempers flare.
    Rending of garments for shiva is a Jewish tradition.

    Anagrams

    * English irregular verbs ----