Render vs Canvas - What's the difference?

render | canvas |


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between render and canvas

is that render is (nautical) to yield or give way while canvas is (nautical) sails in general.

In context|computer graphics|lang=en terms the difference between render and canvas

is that render is (computer graphics) an image produced by rendering a model while canvas is (computer graphics) a region on which graphics can be rendered.

As verbs the difference between render and canvas

is that render is to cause to become while canvas is to cover an area or object with canvas.

As nouns the difference between render and canvas

is that render is a substance similar to stucco but exclusively applied to masonry walls or render can be one who rends while canvas is a type of coarse cloth, woven from hemp, useful for making sails and tents or as a surface for paintings.

render

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) .

Alternative forms

* rendre (archaic)

Verb

(en verb)
  • To cause to become.
  • * , chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=[…] St.?Bede's at this period of its history was perhaps the poorest and most miserable parish in the East End of London. Close-packed, crushed by the buttressed height of the railway viaduct, rendered airless by huge walls of factories, it at once banished lively interest from a stranger's mind and left only a dull oppression of the spirit.}}
  • To interpret, give an interpretation or rendition of.
  • * 1748 . David Hume. Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 34.
  • we may, at last, render our philosophy like that of Epictetus
  • To translate into another language.
  • to render Latin into English
  • To pass down.
  • To make over as a return.
  • To give; to give back.
  • to render an account of what really happened
  • * I. Watts
  • Logic renders its daily service to wisdom and virtue.
  • to give up; to yield; to surrender.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll make her render up her page to me.
  • (computer graphics) To transform (a model) into a display on the screen or other media.
  • To capture and turn over to another country secretly and extrajudicially.
  • To convert waste animal tissue into a usable byproduct.
  • (cooking) For fat to drip off meat from cooking.
  • (construction) To cover a wall with a film of cement or plaster.
  • (nautical) To pass; to run; said of the passage of a rope through a block, eyelet, etc.
  • (nautical) To yield or give way.
  • (Totten)
  • (obsolete) To return; to pay back; to restore.
  • * Spenser
  • whose smallest minute lost, no riches render may
  • (obsolete) To inflict, as a retribution; to requite.
  • * Bible, Deuteronomy xxxii. 41
  • I will render vengeance to mine enemies.
    Synonyms
    * (fat dripping) render off
    Derived terms
    * (computer graphics) renderer, rendering

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A substance similar to stucco but exclusively applied to masonry walls.
  • (computer graphics) An image produced by rendering a model.
  • A low-resolution render might look blocky.
  • (obsolete) A surrender.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) A return; a payment of rent.
  • * Blackstone
  • In those early times the king's household was supported by specific renders of corn and other victuals from the tenants of the demesnes.
  • (obsolete) An account given; a statement.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who rends.
  • ----

    canvas

    English

    (wikipedia canvas)

    Noun

    (en-noun) (see usage notes)
  • A type of coarse cloth, woven from hemp, useful for making sails and tents or as a surface for paintings.
  • * 1882 , James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England , Volume 4, p. 556.
  • The term canvas is very widely used, as well to denote the coarse fabrics employed for kitchen use, as for strainers, and wraps for meat, as for the best quality of ordinary table and shirting linen. \
  • A piece of canvas cloth stretched across a frame on which one may paint.
  • A basis for creative work.
  • The author takes rural midwestern life as a canvas for a series of tightly woven character studies .
  • (computer graphics) A region on which graphics can be rendered.
  • (nautical) sails in general
  • A tent.
  • He spent the night under canvas .
  • A painting, or a picture on canvas.
  • (Goldsmith)
  • * Macaulay
  • Light, rich as that which glows on the canvas of Claude.
  • A rough draft or model of a song, air, or other literary or musical composition; especially one to show a poet the measure of the verses he is to make.
  • (Grabb)
  • Usage notes

    The plural is used in the UK and most UK-influenced areas.

    Verb

    (es)
  • To cover an area or object with canvas.