Leftover vs Remains - What's the difference?

leftover | remains |


As nouns the difference between leftover and remains

is that leftover is something left behind; an excess or remainder while remains is what is left after a person (or any organism) dies; a corpse.

As an adjective leftover

is remaining; left behind; extra; in reserve.

As a verb remains is

(remain).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

leftover

English

Alternative forms

* left over, left-over

Adjective

(-)
  • Remaining; left behind; extra; in reserve.
  • Do you want some of the leftover supplies from the event?
  • (chiefly, in the plural, usually, of food) Remaining after a meal is complete or eaten for a later meal or snack.
  • I have some leftover spaghetti in the fridge, so I don't plan to cook tonight.
    Not leftovers again.

    Usage notes

    * When used after a verb (as part of a predicate phrase), use two separate words: *: I can walk for miles and still have energy left over.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something left behind; an excess or remainder.
  • It's a leftover from yesterday, but it's still perfectly good.
    The entire wheel of cheese is a leftover from the party.

    remains

    Noun

    (en-plural noun)
  • What is left after a person (or any organism) dies; a corpse.
  • The victim's remains were one small piece of bone.
  • Historical or archaeological relics.
  • (senseid)The extant writings of a deceased person.
  • All that is left of the stock of some things; remnants.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=Foreword citation , passage=Everything a living animal could do to destroy and to desecrate bed and walls had been done. […]  A canister of flour from the kitchen had been thrown at the looking-glass and lay like trampled snow over the remains of a decent blue suit with the lining ripped out which lay on top of the ruin of a plastic wardrobe.}}
  • (rare)  .
  • Verb

    (head)
  • (remain)
  • We'll go ahead, while she remains here.