Release vs Acquit - What's the difference?

release | acquit |


As verbs the difference between release and acquit

is that release is to let go (of); to cease to hold or contain or release can be to lease again; to grant a new lease of; to let back while acquit is to declare or find not guilty; innocent or acquit can be (archaic) past participle of acquit , set free, rid of.

As a noun release

is the event of setting (someone or something) free (eg hostages, slaves, prisoners, caged animals, hooked or stuck mechanisms).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

release

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) relaisser (variant of relascher).

Noun

(en noun)
  • The event of setting (someone or something) free (e.g. hostages, slaves, prisoners, caged animals, hooked or stuck mechanisms).
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Charles T. Ambrose
  • , title= Alzheimer’s Disease , volume=101, issue=3, page=200, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Similar studies of rats have employed four different intracranial resorbable, slow sustained release systems—surgical foam, a thermal gel depot, a microcapsule or biodegradable polymer beads.}}
  • (software) The distribution of an initial or new and upgraded version of a computer software product; the distribution can be both public or private.
  • Anything recently released or made available (as for sale).
  • That which is released, untied or let go.
  • Derived terms
    * prerelease * release notes * release from requirement * software release * release process

    Verb

    (releas)
  • To let go (of); to cease to hold or contain.
  • To make available to the public.
  • To free or liberate; to set free.
  • To discharge.
  • (telephone) (of a call) To hang up.
  • (legal) To let go, as a legal claim; to discharge or relinquish a right to, as lands or tenements, by conveying to another who has some right or estate in possession, as when the person in remainder releases his right to the tenant in possession; to quit.
  • To loosen; to relax; to remove the obligation of.
  • to release an ordinance
    (Hooker)
  • (soccer) To set up; to provide with a goal-scoring opportunity
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 13, author=Sam Lyon, work=BBC
  • , title= Borussia Dortmund 1-1 Arsenal , passage=With the Gunners far too lightweight in midfield, Mikel Arteta dropped back into a deeper-lying role. This freed Yossi Benayoun to go further forward, a move that helped forge a rare Arsenal chance on 30 minutes when the Israeli released Van Persie, only for the Dutchman's snap-shot to be tipped around the post.}}
    Antonyms
    * hold

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (releas)
  • To lease again; to grant a new lease of; to let back.
  • acquit

    English

    Alternative forms

    * acquite (archaic)

    Verb

  • To declare or find not guilty; innocent.
  • * '>citation
  • To set free, release or discharge from an obligation, duty, liability, burden, or from an accusation or charge.
  • The jury acquitted the prisoner ''of'' the charge.
  • * 1775 , , The Duenna
  • His poverty, can you acquit him of that?
  • * 1837 , , “Lord Bacon” in The Edinburgh Review , July 1837
  • If he [Bacon] was convicted, it was because it was impossible to acquit him without offering the grossest outrage to justice and common sense.
  • (obsolete, rare) To pay for; to atone for
  • * , line 1071
  • Till life to death acquit my forced offence.
  • To discharge, as a claim or debt; to clear off; to pay off; to requite, to fulfill.
  • * , 1200
  • Aquyte him wel, for goddes love,’ quod he;
  • * 1640 , , Tasso
  • Midst foes (as champion of the faith) he ment / That palme or cypress should his painees acquite .
  • * 1836 , , Orations I-382
  • I admit it to be not so much the duty as the privilege of an American citizen to acquit this obligation to the memory of his fathers with discretion and generosity.
  • * 1844 , ” in Essays: second series
  • We see young men who owe us a new world, so readily and lavishly they promise, but they never acquit the debt; they die young and dodge the account: or if they live, they lose themselves in the crowd.
  • (reflexive) To clear one’s self.
  • * , III-ii
  • Pray God he may acquit him of suspicion!
  • (reflexive) To bear or conduct one’s self; to perform one’s part.
  • The soldier acquitted himself well in battle.
    The orator acquitted himself very poorly.
  • * November 2 2014 , Daniel Taylor, " Sergio Agüero strike wins derby for Manchester City against 10-man United," guardian.co.uk
  • Van Gaal responded by replacing Adnan Januzaj with Carrick and, in fairness, the emergency centre-half did exceedingly well given that he has not played since May. McNair also acquitted himself well after Rojo was injured sliding into a challenge with Martín Demichelis
  • * 1766 , , The vicar of Wakefield , xiv
  • Though this was one of the first mercantile transactions of my life, yet I had no doubt about acquitting myself with reputation.
  • (obsolete) To release, set free, rescue.
  • * , I-vii-52
  • Till I have acquit your captive Knight.
  • (archaic)
  • * , I-iii
  • I am glad I am so acquit of this tinder box.

    Synonyms

    * absolve * clear * exonerate * innocent * exculpate * release * discharge

    Derived terms

    * acquital, acquittal

    Antonyms

    * (to declare innocent) condemn, convict