Rein vs Reim - What's the difference?

rein | reim |


As a verb rein

is to give.

As a noun reim is

(south africa) a strip of oxhide, deprived of hair and made pliable, used for twisting into ropes, etc.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

rein

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) reyne, from (etyl) resne (Modern French .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A strap or rope attached to the bridle or bit, used to control a horse, animal or young child.
  • (figurative) An instrument or means of curbing, restraining, or governing.
  • * Milton
  • Let their eyes rove without rein .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To direct or stop a horse by using reins.
  • * Chapman
  • He mounts and reins his horse.
  • To restrain; to control; to check.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Being once chafed, he cannot / Be reined again to temperance.
    Derived terms
    * rein in

    Derived terms

    * free rein * hold the reins * keep a tight rein on * draw rein * rein back * rein in * rein up * take the reins

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) reines, (etyl) reins, and their source, (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A kidney.
  • *, II.12:
  • *:a man subject to these like imaginations.
  • *1611 , (King James Bible), :
  • *:He hath caused the arrows of his quiver to enter into my reins .
  • The inward impulses; the affections and passions, formerly supposed to be located in the area of the kidneys.
  • *Bible, Proverbs xxiii. 16
  • *:My reins rejoice, when thy lips speak right things.
  • *Bible, Revelations ii. 23
  • *:I am he which searcheth the reins and hearts.
  • reim

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (South Africa) A strip of oxhide, deprived of hair and made pliable, used for twisting into ropes, etc.
  • (Simmonds)
    (Webster 1913) ----