Dreadest vs Readest - What's the difference?

dreadest | readest |


As an adjective dreadest

is (dread).

As a verb readest is

(archaic) second person singular, present tense of read.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

dreadest

English

Adjective

(head)
  • (dread)

  • dread

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To fear greatly.
  • To anticipate with fear.
  • I'm dreading getting the results of the test, as it could decide my whole life.
  • * 1877 , (Anna Sewell), (Black Beauty) Chapter 22[http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Black_Beauty/22]
  • Day by day, hole by hole our bearing reins were shortened, and instead of looking forward with pleasure to having my harness put on as I used to do, I began to dread it.
  • To be in dread, or great fear.
  • * Bible, Deuteronomy i. 29
  • Dread not, neither be afraid of them.

    Derived terms

    * dreadable * dreadworthy

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Great fear in view of impending evil; fearful apprehension of danger; anticipatory terror.
  • * Tillotson
  • the secret dread of divine displeasure
  • * Shakespeare
  • the dread of something after death
  • * '>citation
  • Reverential or respectful fear; awe.
  • * Bible, Genesis ix 2.
  • The fear of you, and the dread of you, shall be upon every beast of the earth.
  • * Shakespeare
  • His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, / The attribute to awe and majesty, / Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings.
  • Somebody or something dreaded.
  • (obsolete) A person highly revered.
  • * Spenser
  • Una, his dear dread
  • (obsolete) Fury; dreadfulness.
  • (Spenser)
  • A Rastafarian.
  • (chiefly, in the plural) dreadlock
  • Adjective

    (er)
  • Terrible; greatly feared.
  • (archaic) Awe-inspiring; held in fearful awe.
  • *
  • See also

    * dreadlocks * dreadnought

    Anagrams

    * * *

    readest

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (archaic) second person singular, present tense of read
  • Anagrams

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