Waft vs Ramble - What's the difference?

waft | ramble |


As verbs the difference between waft and ramble

is that waft is (ergative) to (cause to) float easily or gently through the air while ramble is to move about aimlessly, or on a winding course.

As nouns the difference between waft and ramble

is that waft is a light breeze while ramble is a leisurely stroll; a recreational walk in the countryside.

waft

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • (ergative) To (cause to) float easily or gently through the air.
  • * A breeze came in through the open window and wafted her sensuous perfume into my eager nostrils.
  • * 1922 , (James Joyce), Chapter 13
  • Through the open window of the church the fragrant incense was wafted and with it the fragrant names of her who was conceived without stain of original sin…
  • * 1914 , Hugh G. Evelyn-White’s translation of Hymn to Aphrodite from the .[http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0138%3Ahymn%3D6]
  • There the moist breath of the western wind wafted her over the waves of the loud-moaning sea in soft foam, and there the gold-filleted Hours welcomed her joyously.
  • To be moved, or to pass, on a buoyant medium; to float.
  • * Dryden
  • And now the shouts waft near the citadel.
  • To give notice to by waving something; to wave the hand to; to beckon.
  • * Shakespeare
  • But soft: who wafts us yonder?

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A light breeze.
  • Something (a scent or odor), such as a perfume, that is carried through the air.
  • * 1908 ,
  • Meanwhile, the wafts from his old home pleaded, whispered, conjured, and finally claimed him imperiously.
  • * 2010 September, "The SLM'' Calendar", , ISSN 1090-5723, volume 16, issue 9, page 170:
  • Patrol Magazine says of this Oxford, Miss., band: "Guitars are responsible for every noise in Colour Revolt's mix—not a single note of piano, waft of synthesizer, or evidence of electronic tampering are to be found."
  • (nautical) A flag, (also called a waif or wheft), used to indicate wind direction or, with a knot tied in the center, as a signal.
  • ramble

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A leisurely stroll; a recreational walk in the countryside.
  • * 1811 , Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility , chapter 16
  • Marianne was prevailed upon to join her sisters in their usual walk, instead of wandering away by herself. Hitherto she had carefully avoided every companion in her rambles . If her sisters intended to walk on the downs, she directly stole away towards the lanes
  • *
  • A rambling; an instance of someone talking at length without direction.
  • (mining) A bed of shale over the seam of coal.
  • (Raymond)
  • A section of woodland suitable for leisurely walking.
  • Verb

  • To move about aimlessly, or on a winding course
  • To walk for pleasure; to amble or saunter.
  • To talk or write incessantly, unclearly, or incoherently, with many digressions.
  • Francine has a tendency to ramble when it gets to be late in the evening.

    Synonyms

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    Anagrams

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