Getup vs Raise - What's the difference?

getup | raise |


As nouns the difference between getup and raise

is that getup is (chiefly|us|informal) a costume or outfit, especially one that is ostentatious or otherwise unusual while raise is (us) an increase in wages or salary; a rise (uk).

As a verb raise is

(label) to cause to rise; to lift or elevate.

getup

English

Alternative forms

* get up * get-up

Noun

(en noun)
  • (chiefly, US, informal) A costume or outfit, especially one that is ostentatious or otherwise unusual.
  • *1899 ,
  • When near the buildings I met a white man, in such an unexpected elegance of get–up that in the first moment I took him for a sort of vision.
  • * 1917 , " 1,200 Reading Firemen March," Reading Eagle (Pennsylvania, USA), 28 Oct. p. 4:
  • The Schnitzelbank Band, each member attired in an odd getup , received many comments for the manner in which the men marched.
  • * 2009 , " Worried They Will Miss the War: Inside the Mind of West Point's Class of 2009," Newsweek , 6 June:
  • [A] parade of costumed cadets trots by: a shark costume, an Uncle Sam getup and three young men in form-fitting bodysuits.
  • (informal) A fight or altercation.
  • * 2002 , Andrea Sachs, " Caricature Builder," Time , 21 Jan.:
  • "A bully. Picked on fellows. He loved to fight. But I never saw him in a getup with a fellow his own size."
  • (publishing) Layout and production style, as of a magazine.
  • See also

    * all get up * get up

    raise

    English

    Verb

    (rais)
  • (label) To cause to rise; to lift or elevate.
  • # To form by the accumulation of materials or constituent parts; to build up; to erect.
  • #* Bible, (w) xxxix. 3
  • I will raise forts against thee.
  • # To cause something to come to the surface of the sea.
  • # (label) To cause (the land or any other object) to seem higher by drawing nearer to it.
  • # (label) To cause (a dead person) to live again, to cause to be undead.
  • # (military) To remove or break up (a blockade), either by withdrawing the ships or forces employed in enforcing it, or by driving them away or dispersing them.
  • (label) To create, increase or develop.
  • # To collect.
  • # To bring up; to grow; to promote.
  • # To mention (a question, issue) for discussion.
  • # (label) To create; to constitute (a use , or a beneficial interest in property).
  • # (label) To bring into being; to produce; to cause to arise, come forth, or appear.
  • #* Bible, (w) xviii. 18.
  • I will raise them up a prophet from among their brethren, like unto thee.
  • #* (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • God vouchsafes to raise another world From him [Noah], and all his anger to forget.
  • #* {{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers)
  • , chapter=5, title= A Cuckoo in the Nest , passage=The most rapid and most seductive transition in all human nature is that which attends the palliation of a ravenous appetite.
  • To respond to a bet by increasing the amount required to continue in the hand.
  • (label) To exponentiate, to involute.
  • To extract (a subject or other verb argument) out of an inner clause.
  • *
  • To increase the nominal value of (a cheque, money order, etc.) by fraudulently changing the writing or printing in which the sum payable is specified.
  • Synonyms

    * lift

    Derived terms

    * raise Cain * raise fire * raise one's eyebrows * raise someone's consciousness * raise the alarm * raise the roof * raised by wolves * raised in a barn

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (US) An increase in wages or salary; a rise (UK).
  • The boss gave me a raise .
  • (weightlifting) A shoulder exercise in which the arms are elevated against resistance.
  • (curling) A shot in which the delivered stone bumps another stone forward.
  • (poker) A bet which increased the previous bet.
  • Derived terms

    * lateral raise * leg raise

    Anagrams

    *