Chide vs Rail - What's the difference?

chide | rail |


In lang=en terms the difference between chide and rail

is that chide is to admonish in blame; to reproach angrily while rail is to range in a line.

In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between chide and rail

is that chide is (obsolete) to utter words of disapprobation and displeasure; to find fault; to contend angrily while rail is (obsolete) specifically, a woman's headscarf or neckerchief.

As verbs the difference between chide and rail

is that chide is to admonish in blame; to reproach angrily while rail is to travel by railway or rail can be to complain violently ((against), (about)) or rail can be (label) to gush, flow (of liquid).

As a noun rail is

a horizontal bar extending between supports and used for support or as a barrier; a railing or rail can be any of several birds in the family rallidae or rail can be (obsolete) an item of clothing; a cloak or other garment; a dress.

chide

English

Verb

  • To admonish in blame; to reproach angrily.
  • 1591' ''And yet I was last '''chidden for being too slow.'' — Shakespeare, ''The Two Gentlemen of Verona , .
    1598' ''If the scorn of your bright eyne / Have power to raise such love in mine, / Alack, in me what strange effect / Would they work in mild aspect? / Whiles you '''chid me, I did love'' — Shakespeare, ''As You Like It , .
    {{quote-book
    , year=1920 , year_published=2008 , edition=HTML , editor= , author=Edgar Rice Burroughs , title=Thuvia, Maiden of Mars , chapter= citation , genre= , publisher=The Gutenberg Project , isbn= , page= , passage=Then she had not chidden' him for the use of that familiar salutation, nor did she ' chide him now, though she was promised to another. }}
  • (obsolete) To utter words of disapprobation and displeasure; to find fault; to contend angrily.
  • 1611' ''And Jacob was wroth, and '''chode with Laban: and Jacob answered and said to Laban, What is my trespass? what is my sin, that thou hast so hotly pursued after me? — Genesis 31:36 KJV.
  • (ambitransitive) To make a clamorous noise; to chafe.
  • * Shakespeare
  • As doth a rock against the chiding flood.
  • * Shakespeare
  • the sea that chides the banks of England

    Synonyms

    * See also

    rail

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), (m), ; see regular.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A horizontal bar extending between supports and used for support or as a barrier; a railing.
  • * , chapter=7
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=Old Applegate, in the stern, just set and looked at me, and Lord James, amidship, waved both arms and kept hollering for help. I took a couple of everlasting big strokes and managed to grab hold of the skiff's rail , close to the stern.}}
  • The metal bar that makes the track for a railroad.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-01, volume=407, issue=8838
  • , page=13 (Technology Quarterly), magazine=(The Economist) , title= Ideas coming down the track , passage=A “moving platform” scheme
  • A railroad; a railway.
  • A horizontal piece of wood that serves to separate sections of a door or window.
  • (surfing) One of the lengthwise edges of a surfboard.
  • * Nick Carroll, surfline.com [http://www.surfline.com/community/whoknows/10_21_rails.cfm]:
  • Rails alone can only ever have a marginal effect on a board's general turning ability.
    Derived terms
    * guardrail * handrail * live rail * railcard * railfanning * railhead * railway * ride the rails * split rail * third rail

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To travel by railway.
  • * Rudyard Kipling
  • Mottram of the Indian Survey had ridden thirty and railed one hundred miles from his lonely post in the desert
  • To enclose with rails or a railing.
  • * Ayliffe
  • It ought to be fenced in and railed .
  • To range in a line.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • They were brought to London all railed in ropes, like a team of horses in a cart.

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun) (Rallidae) (Rallidae)
  • Any of several birds in the family Rallidae.
  • Usage notes

    Not all birds in the family Rallidae are rails by their common name. The family also includes coots]], moorhens, crakes, flufftails, [[waterhen, waterhens and others.
    Derived terms
    * banded rail

    See also

    * corncrake

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) railler.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To complain violently ((against), (about)).
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=June 4 , author=Lewis Smith , title=Queen's English Society says enuf is enough, innit? , work=the Guardian citation , page= , passage=The Queen may be celebrating her jubilee but the Queen's English Society, which has railed against the misuse and deterioration of the English language, is to fold.}}
  • * 1994 , Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom , Abacus 2010, p. 27:
  • Chief Joyi railed against the white man, whom he believed had deliberately sundered the Xhosa tribe, dividing brother from brother.

    Etymology 4

    From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    *

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) An item of clothing; a cloak or other garment; a dress.
  • (obsolete) Specifically, a woman's headscarf or neckerchief.
  • (Fairholt)
    Derived terms
    * night-rail

    Etymology 5

    Probably from (etyl) raier, (etyl) raier.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (label) To gush, flow (of liquid).
  • *, Bk.V, Ch.iv:
  • *:his breste and his brayle was bloodé – and hit rayled all over the see.
  • *1596 , (Edmund Spenser), (The Faerie Queene) , IV.2:
  • *:So furiously each other did assayle, / As if their soules they would attonce haue rent / Out of their brests, that streames of bloud did rayle / Adowne, as if their springes of life were spent.
  • Anagrams

    * * * * * * English terms with multiple etymologies ----