Wafted vs Rafted - What's the difference?

wafted | rafted |


As verbs the difference between wafted and rafted

is that wafted is (waft) while rafted is (raft).

wafted

English

Verb

(head)
  • (waft)

  • waft

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (ergative) To (cause to) float easily or gently through the air.
  • * A breeze came in through the open window and wafted her sensuous perfume into my eager nostrils.
  • * 1922 , (James Joyce), Chapter 13
  • Through the open window of the church the fragrant incense was wafted and with it the fragrant names of her who was conceived without stain of original sin…
  • * 1914 , Hugh G. Evelyn-White’s translation of Hymn to Aphrodite from the .[http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0138%3Ahymn%3D6]
  • There the moist breath of the western wind wafted her over the waves of the loud-moaning sea in soft foam, and there the gold-filleted Hours welcomed her joyously.
  • To be moved, or to pass, on a buoyant medium; to float.
  • * Dryden
  • And now the shouts waft near the citadel.
  • To give notice to by waving something; to wave the hand to; to beckon.
  • * Shakespeare
  • But soft: who wafts us yonder?

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A light breeze.
  • Something (a scent or odor), such as a perfume, that is carried through the air.
  • * 1908 ,
  • Meanwhile, the wafts from his old home pleaded, whispered, conjured, and finally claimed him imperiously.
  • * 2010 September, "The SLM'' Calendar", , ISSN 1090-5723, volume 16, issue 9, page 170:
  • Patrol Magazine says of this Oxford, Miss., band: "Guitars are responsible for every noise in Colour Revolt's mix—not a single note of piano, waft of synthesizer, or evidence of electronic tampering are to be found."
  • (nautical) A flag, (also called a waif or wheft), used to indicate wind direction or, with a knot tied in the center, as a signal.
  • rafted

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (raft)
  • Anagrams

    * *

    raft

    English

    (wikipedia raft)

    Etymology 1

    From Scandinavian; compare West (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A flat structure made of planks, barrels etc., that floats on water, and is used for transport, emergencies or a platform for swimmers.
  • A flat-bottomed inflatable craft for floating or drifting on water.
  • A thick crowd of seabirds or sea mammals.
  • (US) A collection of logs, fallen trees, etc. which obstructs navigation in a river.
  • (slang, informal) A large collection of people or things taken indiscriminately.
  • * W. D. Howells
  • a whole raft of folks
    Derived terms
    * life raft

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to convey on a raft
  • to make into a raft
  • to travel by raft
  • Etymology 2

    Alteration of (raff).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A large (but unspecified) number, a lot.
  • * 2007 , Edwin Mullins, The Popes of Avignon , Blue Bridge 2008, p. 31:
  • Among those arrested was the grand master himself, Jacques de Molay, who found himself facing a raft of charges based on the specious evidence of former knights [...].

    Etymology 3

    Verb

    (head)
  • (reave)
  • (Spenser)

    Anagrams

    * * * * ----