Raddle vs Raddled - What's the difference?

raddle | raddled |


As a noun raddle

is a red ochre or raddle can be a long, flexible stick, rod, or branch, interwoven with others between upright posts or stakes, in making a kind of hedge or fence.

As a verb raddle

is to mark with raddle; to daub something red.

As an adjective raddled is

worn-out and broken-down.

raddle

English

Etymology 1

Related to red. (en)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A red ochre.
  • Synonyms
    * reddle * ruddle

    Verb

    (raddl)
  • To mark with raddle; to daub something red.
  • To interweave or twist together.
  • * Daniel Defoe
  • Raddling or working it up like basket work.
    Synonyms
    * reddle * ruddle

    See also

    * ruddy

    Etymology 2

    Compare (etyl) word for "sieve", or perhaps English reed.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A long, flexible stick, rod, or branch, interwoven with others between upright posts or stakes, in making a kind of hedge or fence.
  • A hedge or fence made with raddles.
  • (Todd)
  • An instrument consisting of a wooden bar, with a row of upright pegs set in it, used by domestic weavers to keep the warp of a proper width and prevent tangling when it is wound upon the beam of the loom.
  • Anagrams

    * *

    raddled

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Worn-out and broken-down.