Early vs Quick - What's the difference?

early | quick |


As adjectives the difference between early and quick

is that early is at a time in advance of the usual or expected event while quick is moving with speed, rapidity or swiftness, or capable of doing so; rapid; fast.

As adverbs the difference between early and quick

is that early is at a time before expected; sooner than usual while quick is (colloquial) with speed, quickly.

As nouns the difference between early and quick

is that early is a shift (scheduled work period) that takes place early in the day while quick is raw or sensitive flesh, especially that underneath finger and toe nails.

As a verb quick is

to amalgamate surfaces prior to gilding or silvering by dipping them into a solution of mercury in nitric acid.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

early

English

Adjective

(er)
  • At a time in advance of the usual or expected event.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-29, volume=407, issue=8842, page=28, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= High and wet , passage=Floods in northern India, mostly in the small state of Uttarakhand, have wrought disaster on an enormous scale. The early , intense onset of the monsoon on June 14th swelled rivers, washing away roads, bridges, hotels and even whole villages. Rock-filled torrents smashed vehicles and homes, burying victims under rubble and sludge.}}
  • Arriving a time before expected; sooner than on time.
  • Near the start or beginning.
  • *
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients, chapter=1 , passage='Twas early June, the new grass was flourishing everywheres, the posies in the yard—peonies and such—in full bloom, the sun was shining, and the water of the bay was blue, with light green streaks where the shoal showed.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The attack of the MOOCs , passage=Dotcom mania was slow in coming to higher education, but now it has the venerable industry firmly in its grip. Since the launch early last year of Udacity and Coursera, two Silicon Valley start-ups offering free education through MOOCs, massive open online courses, the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations.}}
  • Having begun to occur; in its early stages.
  • Synonyms

    * (at a time in advance of the usual): premature * (near the start): first

    Antonyms

    * (at a time in advance of the usual): late * : terminal

    Derived terms

    (Derived terms) * earliness * early bath * early bird/the early bird catches the worm * early doors * early grave * early innings * earlyish * Early Latin * early modern * early music * early on * early purple orchid * early retirement * early spider orchid * early syphilis * * early warning radar * early winter cress * early withdrawal * nice and early

    Adverb

    (er)
  • At a time before expected; sooner than usual.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=No matter how early I came down, I would find him on the veranda, smoking cigarettes, or otherwise his man would be there with a message to say that his master would shortly join me if I would kindly wait.}}
  • Soon; in good time; seasonably.
  • * Bible, Proverbs viii. 17
  • Those that seek me early shall find me.
  • *
  • You must wake and call me early .

    Synonyms

    * prematurely

    Antonyms

    * late, tardily

    Noun

    (earlies)
  • A shift (scheduled work period) that takes place early in the day.
  • * 2007 , Paul W. Browning, The Good Guys Wear Blue (page 193)
  • On my first day on the watch after leaving the shoplifting squad I paraded on earlies but had completely forgotten to take my ear ring off.

    Statistics

    *

    quick

    English

    (wikipedia quick)

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Moving with speed, rapidity or swiftness, or capable of doing so; rapid; fast.
  • I ran to the station – but I wasn't quick enough.
    He's a quick runner.
  • Occurring in a short time; happening or done rapidly.
  • That was a quick meal.
  • Lively, fast-thinking, witty, intelligent.
  • You have to be very quick to be able to compete in ad-lib theatrics.
  • Mentally agile, alert, perceptive.
  • My father is old but he still has a quick wit.
  • Of temper: easily aroused to anger; quick-tempered.
  • * Latimer
  • The bishop was somewhat quick with them, and signified that he was much offended.
  • (archaic) Alive, living.
  • * Bible, 2 Timothy iv. 1
  • the Lord Jesus Christ, who shall judge the quick and the dead
  • * Herbert
  • Man is no star, but a quick coal / Of mortal fire.
  • * 1874 , , X
  • The inmost oratory of my soul,
    Wherein thou ever dwellest quick or dead,
    Is black with grief eternal for thy sake.
  • (archaic) Pregnant, especially at the stage where the foetus's movements can be felt; figuratively, alive with some emotion or feeling.
  • * Shakespeare
  • she's quick ; the child brags in her belly already: tis yours
  • Of water: flowing.
  • Burning, flammable, fiery.
  • Fresh; bracing; sharp; keen.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The air is quick there, / And it pierces and sharpens the stomach.
  • (mining, of a vein of ore) productive; not "dead" or barren
  • Synonyms

    * (moving with speed) fast, speedy, rapid, swift * See also

    Antonyms

    * (moving with speed) slow

    Derived terms

    * kwik * quick-change artist * quick-drying * quicken * quick fix * quickie * quicklime * quickly * quick on his feet * quick on the draw * quicksand * quicksilver * quick smart * quickstep * quick-witted

    Adverb

    (er)
  • (colloquial) with speed, quickly
  • Get rich quick.
    Come here, quick !
  • * John Locke
  • If we consider how very quick the actions of the mind are performed.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • raw or sensitive flesh, especially that underneath finger and toe nails.
  • plants used in making a quickset hedge
  • * Evelyn
  • The works are curiously hedged with quick .
  • The life; the mortal point; a vital part; a part susceptible to serious injury or keen feeling.
  • * Latimer
  • This test nippeth, this toucheth the quick .
  • * Fuller
  • How feebly and unlike themselves they reason when they come to the quick of the difference!
  • quitchgrass
  • (Tennyson)

    Derived terms

    * cut to the quick * to the quick

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To amalgamate surfaces prior to gilding or silvering by dipping them into a solution of mercury in nitric acid.
  • To quicken.
  • * (Thomas Hardy)
  • I rose as if quicked by a spur I was bound to obey.

    References

    * * 1000 English basic words ----