Quell vs Mollify - What's the difference?

quell | mollify |


As verbs the difference between quell and mollify

is that quell is (obsolete|transitive) to kill while mollify is to ease a burden, particularly worry; make less painful; to comfort.

As a noun quell

is a spring or fountain.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

quell

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) .

Verb

(en verb)
  • (obsolete) To kill.
  • (Spenser)
  • To subdue, to put down; to silence or force (someone) to submit.
  • * Macaulay
  • The nation obeyed the call, rallied round the sovereign, and enabled him to quell the disaffected minority.
  • * Longfellow
  • Northward marching to quell the sudden revolt.
  • To suppress, to put an end to (something); to extinguish.
  • to quell grief
    to quell the tumult of the soul
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2014 , date=December 13 , author=Mandeep Sanghera , title=Burnley 1-0 Southampton , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=However, after quelling Burnley's threat, Southampton failed to build on their growing danger culminating in Tadic's missed penalty.}}
  • (obsolete) To be subdued or abated; to diminish.
  • * Spenser
  • Winter's wrath begins to quell .
  • To die.
  • * Spenser
  • Yet he did quake and quaver, like to quell .

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) Quelle .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A spring or fountain.
  • English terms with multiple etymologies

    mollify

    English

    Alternative forms

    * mollifie

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To ease a burden, particularly worry; make less painful; to comfort.
  • * 1893 , (Henry George), The Condition of Labor: An Open Letter to Pope Leo XIII, p. 104:
  • *:All that charity can do where injustice exists is here and there to somewhat mollify the effects of injustice.
  • * 1997 , A Government Reinvented: A Study of Alberta's Deficit Elimination Program, p. 408:
  • *:The draft Charter School Handbook issued in November 1994 sought to mollify concerns over teacher quality, if not ATA membership, by requiring teacher certification.
  • To appease (anger), pacify, gain the good will of.
  • * 1867 , , chapter 2:
  • Although this invitation was accompanied with a curtsey that might have softened the heart of a church-warden, it by no means mollified the beadle.
  • * 1916 , , chapter 5:
  • The angry goat was quite mollified by the respectful tone in which he was addressed.
  • To soften; to make tender
  • * 1662 , , Book III, A Collection of Several Philosophical Writings of Dr. Henry More, p. 113:
  • "Nor is it any more difficulty for him to mollifie what is hard, then it is to harden what is so soft and fluid as the Aire."
  • * 1724 , (William Burkitt), Expository Notes, with Practical Observations on the New Testament, p. 102:
  • *:By thy kindness thou wilt melt and mollify his spirit towards thee, as hardest metals are melted by coals of fire …
  • Synonyms

    * (to ease a burden) assuage, calm, comfort, mitigate, soothe * (to appease) appease, conciliate, pacify, placate, propitiate, satisfy * See also