Quarrel vs Chest - What's the difference?

quarrel | chest |


In context|obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between quarrel and chest

is that quarrel is (obsolete) earnest desire or longing while chest is (obsolete) a coffin.

In context|transitive|obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between quarrel and chest

is that quarrel is (obsolete) to argue or squabble with while chest is (obsolete) to place in a coffin.

As nouns the difference between quarrel and chest

is that quarrel is a verbal dispute or heated argument or quarrel can be a diamond-shaped piece of coloured glass forming part of a stained glass window while chest is a box, now usually a large strong box with a secure convex lid or chest can be debate; quarrel; strife; enmity.

As verbs the difference between quarrel and chest

is that quarrel is to disagree while chest is to hit with one's chest (front of one's body).

quarrel

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) querele (modern French querelle), itself from (etyl) . Replaced (etyl) sacan by 1340 as “ground for complaint”.

Noun

(en noun)
  • A verbal dispute or heated argument.
  • We got into a silly quarrel about what food to order.
  • * Quarrels would not last long if the fault were only on one side.
  • A ground of dispute or objection; a complaint.
  • A few customers in the shop had some quarrel s with us, so we called for the manager.
  • * Herodias had a quarrel against him, and would have killed him. - Bible, Mark vi. 19
  • * You mistake, sir. I am sure no man hath any quarrel to me.'' - Shakespeare, ''Twelfth Night , Act 3, scene 4
  • (obsolete) earnest desire or longing.
  • (Holland)
    Synonyms
    * See also

    Verb

    (intransitive)
  • To disagree.
  • To contend, argue strongly, squabble.
  • * Sir W. Temple
  • Beasts called sociable quarrel in hunger and lust.
  • To find fault; to cavil.
  • to quarrel with one's lot
  • * Roscommon
  • I will not quarrel with a slight mistake.
  • (obsolete) To argue or squabble with.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • I had quarrelled my brother purposely.

    Derived terms

    * quarreler, quarreller * quarrelsome

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) as "square-headed bolt for a crossbow" c.1225, from (etyl) quarel (modern French carreau), from , related to quattuor "four".

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A diamond-shaped piece of coloured glass forming part of a stained glass window.
  • A square tile; quarry tile.
  • A square-headed arrow for a crossbow.
  • *1600 , (Edward Fairfax), The (Jerusalem Delivered) of (w), Book VII, ciii:
  • *:Twanged the string, out flew the quarrel long, / And through the subtle air did singing pass.
  • *Sir (John Mandeville) (c.1350)
  • *:to shoot with arrows and quarrel
  • *Sir (Walter Scott) (1771-1832)
  • *:two arblasts,with windlaces and quarrels
  • *1829 , (Edward Augustus Kendall), The Olio or Museum of Entertainment , Vol.III, p.174
  • *:The small cross-bow, called the arbalet or arbalest, is said to have been invented by the Sicilians. It was carried by the foot-soldiers, and when used was charged with a quarrel or bar-bolt, that is, a small arrow with a flat head, one of which occasioned the death of Harold at the battle of Hastings,.
  • *2000 . , p.379
  • *:Satin scooped up his crossbow and sent a few quarrel s after them as they ran, to see them off the faster.
  • A small opening in window tracery, of which the cusps etc. make the form nearly square.
  • A four-sided cutting tool or chisel with a diamond-shaped end.
  • See also

    * (wikipedia) * quarl

    chest

    English

    {{ picdic , image=Chest.jpg , width=310 , detail1= , detail2= }}

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) cheste, chiste, from (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A box, now usually a large strong box with a secure convex lid.
  • :
  • *
  • *:But then I had the [massive] flintlock by me for protection. ¶.
  • (lb) A coffin.
  • The place in which public money is kept; a treasury.
  • :
  • A chest of drawers.
  • (senseid)(lb) The portion of the front of the human body from the base of the neck to the top of the abdomen; the thorax. Also the analogous area in other animals.
  • :
  • #A hit or blow made with one's chest.
  • #:
  • Synonyms
    * (the thorax) breast * (box) trunk
    Derived terms
    * bad chest * chest cavity * chest cold * chestless * chestlike * chest of drawers * chest pass * chestnut * chest wall * chesty * get off one’s chest * hope chest * keep one's cards close to one's chest * treasure chest * war chest

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To hit with one's chest (front of one's body)
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=January 23 , author=Alistair Magowan , title=Blackburn 2 - 0 West Brom , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Pedersen fed Kalinic in West Brom's defensive third and his chested lay-off was met on the burst by the Canadian who pelted by Tamas and smashed the ball into the top of Myhill's net. }}
  • To deposit in a chest.
  • (obsolete) To place in a coffin.
  • * Bible, Genesis 1. 26
  • He dieth and is chested .

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) cheste, cheeste, cheaste, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Debate; quarrel; strife; enmity.