Pitch vs Pussycat - What's the difference?

pitch | pussycat |


As nouns the difference between pitch and pussycat

is that pitch is a sticky, gummy substance secreted by trees; sap or pitch can be a throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand or pitch can be (music) the perceived frequency of a sound or note while pussycat is .

As a verb pitch

is to cover or smear with pitch or pitch can be (senseid)to throw or pitch can be to produce a note of a given pitch.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

pitch

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) . Cognate with Dutch pek, German Pech.

Noun

(es)
  • A sticky, gummy substance secreted by trees; sap.
  • It is hard to get this pitch off of my hand.
  • A dark, extremely viscous material remaining in still after distilling crude oil and tar.
  • They put pitch''' on the mast to protect it.'' ''The barrel was sealed with '''pitch .
    It was pitch black because there was no moon.
  • (geology) pitchstone
  • Derived terms
    * pitch-black, pitchblack * pitchblende

    Verb

    (es)
  • To cover or smear with pitch.
  • To darken; to blacken; to obscure.
  • * Addison
  • Soon he found / The welkin pitched with sullen cloud.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) picchen, . More at pick.

    Noun

    (es)
  • A throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand.
  • (senseid)(baseball) The act of pitching a baseball.
  • (sports) The field on which cricket, soccer, rugby or field hockey is played. In cricket', the pitch is in the centre of the field; see ' cricket pitch .
  • An effort to sell or promote something.
  • The distance between evenly spaced objects, e.g. the teeth of a saw, the turns of a screw thread, or letters in a monospace font.
  • A helical scan with a pitch of zero is equivalent to constant z-axis scanning.
  • The angle at which an object sits.
  • More specifically, the rotation angle about the transverse axis.
  • A level or degree.
  • (aviation) A measure of the degree to which an aircraft's nose tilts up or down.
  • (aviation) A measure of the angle of attack of a propeller.
  • (nautical) The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel rotates on its athwartships axis, causing its bow and stern to go up and down. Compare with roll, yaw and heave.
  • The place where a busker performs.
  • An area in a market (or similar) allocated to a particular trader.
  • A point or peak; the extreme point or degree of elevation or depression; hence, a limit or bound.
  • * 1748 , (David Hume), (w) , Oxford University Press (1973), section 11:
  • But, except the mind be disordered by disease or madness, they never can arrive at such a pitch of vivacity
  • * (John Milton)
  • Driven headlong from the pitch of heaven, down / Into this deep.
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • Enterprises of great pitch and moment.
  • * Addison
  • He lived when learning was at its highest pitch .
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=In the eyes of Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke the apotheosis of the Celebrity was complete. The people of Asquith were not only willing to attend the house-warming, but had been worked up to the pitch of eagerness.}}
  • (climbing) A section of a climb or rock face; specifically, the climbing distance between belays or stances.
  • (caving) A vertical cave passage, only negotiable by using rope or ladders.
  • A person or animal's height.
  • *, II.3.2:
  • Alba the emperor was crook-backed, Epictetus lame; that great Alexander a little man of stature, Augustus Cæsar of the same pitch  […].
    (Hudibras)
  • That point of the ground on which the ball pitches or lights when bowled.
  • A descent; a fall; a thrusting down.
  • The point where a declivity begins; hence, the declivity itself; a descending slope; the degree or rate of descent or slope; slant.
  • (mining) The limit of ground set to a miner who receives a share of the ore taken out.
  • (engineering) The distance from centre to centre of any two adjacent teeth of gearing, measured on the pitch line; called also circular pitch .
  • The length, measured along the axis, of a complete turn of the thread of a screw, or of the helical lines of the blades of a screw propeller.
  • The distance between the centres of holes, as of rivet holes in boiler plates.
  • Verb

    (es)
  • (senseid)To throw.
  • He pitched the horseshoe.
  • (transitive, or, intransitive, baseball) To throw (the ball) toward home plate.
  • The hurler pitched a curveball.
    He pitched high and inside.
  • (baseball) To play baseball in the position of pitcher.
  • Bob pitches today.
  • To throw away; discard.
  • He pitched the candy wrapper.
  • To promote, advertise, or attempt to sell.
  • He pitched the idea for months with no takers.
  • To deliver in a certain tone or style, or with a certain audience in mind.
  • At which level should I pitch my presentation?
  • To assemble or erect (a tent).
  • Pitch the tent over there.
  • To fix or place a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp.
  • * Bible, Genesis xxxi. 25
  • Laban with his brethren pitched in the Mount of Gilead.
  • (ambitransitive, aviation, or, nautical) To move so that the front of an aircraft or ship goes alternatively up and down.
  • The typhoon pitched the deck of the ship.
    The airplane pitched .
  • (golf) To play a short, high, lofty shot that lands with backspin.
  • The only way to get on the green from here is to pitch the ball over the bunker.
  • (cricket) To bounce on the playing surface.
  • The ball pitched well short of the batsman.
  • (intransitive, Bristol, of snow) To settle and build up, without melting.
  • To alight; to settle; to come to rest from flight.
  • * Mortimer
  • the tree whereon they [the bees] pitch
  • To fix one's choice; with on'' or ''upon .
  • * Tillotson
  • Pitch upon the best course of life, and custom will render it the more easy.
  • To plunge or fall; especially, to fall forward; to decline or slope.
  • to pitch from a precipice
    The vessel pitches in a heavy sea.
    The field pitches toward the east.
  • To set, face, or pave with rubble or undressed stones, as an embankment or a roadway.
  • (Knight)
  • To set or fix, as a price or value.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • To discard a card for some gain.
  • Etymology 3

    Unknown

    Noun

    (es)
  • (music) The perceived frequency of a sound or note.
  • The pitch of middle "C" is familiar to many musicians.
  • (music) In an a cappella group, the singer responsible for singing a note for the other members to tune themselves by.
  • Bob, our pitch , let out a clear middle "C" and our conductor gave the signal to start.

    Verb

    (es)
  • To produce a note of a given pitch.
  • To fix or set the tone of.
  • to pitch a tune

    References

    * * Notes:

    pussycat

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)