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Dented vs Pushed - What's the difference?

dented | pushed |

As verbs the difference between dented and pushed

is that dented is (dent) while pushed is (push).

dented

English

Verb

(head)
  • (dent)
  • Anagrams

    *

    dent

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) . More at dint.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A shallow deformation in the surface of an object, produced by an impact.
  • The crash produced a dent in the left side of the car.
  • (by extension, informal) A sudden negative change, such as loss, damage, weakening, consumption or diminution, especially one produced by an external force, event or action
  • That purchase put a bit of a dent in my wallet.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=April 11 , author=Phil McNulty , title=Liverpool 3 - 0 Man City , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Andy Carroll's first goals since his £35m move to Liverpool put a dent in Manchester City's Champions League hopes as they were emphatically swept aside at Anfield.}}

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To impact something, producing a dent.
  • To develop a dent or dents.
  • ''Copper is soft and dents easily.

    Etymology 2

    (etyl), from (etyl) dens, dentis, tooth. See tooth.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (engineering) A tooth, as of a card, a gear wheel, etc.
  • (Knight)

    Anagrams

    * English ergative verbs ----

    pushed

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (push)

  • push

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) ).

    Verb

    (es)
  • (intransitive) To apply a force to (an object) such that it moves away from the person or thing applying the force.
  • In his anger he pushed me against the wall and threatened me.
    You need to push quite hard to get this door open.
  • To continually attempt to persuade (a person) into a particular course of action.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • We are pushed for an answer.
  • * Spectator
  • Ambition pushes the soul to such actions as are apt to procure honour to the actor.
  • To press or urge forward; to drive.
  • to push''' an objection too far; to '''push one's luck
  • * Dryden
  • to push his fortune
  • To continually promote (a point of view, a product for sale, etc.).
  • Stop pushing the issue — I'm not interested.
    They're pushing that perfume again.
    There were two men hanging around the school gates today, pushing drugs.
  • (informal) To approach; to come close to.
  • My old car is pushing 250,000 miles.
    He's pushing sixty.'' (= ''he's nearly sixty years old )
  • To tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents.
  • During childbirth, there are times when the obstetrician advises the woman not to push .
  • To continue to attempt to persuade a person into a particular course of action.
  • To make a higher bid at an auction.
  • (poker) To make an all-in bet.
  • (chess) To move (a pawn) directly forward.
  • (computing) To add (a data item) to the top of a stack.
  • * 1992 , Michael A. Miller, The 68000 Microprocessor Family: Architecture, Programming, and Applications (page 47)
  • When the microprocessor decodes the JSR opcode, it stores the operand into the TEMP register and pushes the current contents of the PC ($00 0128) onto the stack.
  • (obsolete) To thrust the points of the horns against; to gore.
  • * Bible, Exodus xxi. 32
  • If the ox shall push a manservant or maidservant, the ox shall be stoned.
  • To burst out of its pot, as a bud or shoot.
  • Synonyms
    * to press, to shove, to thrutch * (continue to attempt to persuade) to press, to urge * (continue to promote) to press, to advertise, to promote * (come close to) to approach, to near * to press, to shove, to thring * (tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents) to bear down
    Antonyms
    * (apply a force to something so it moves away) to draw, to pull, to tug * (put onto a stack) to pop
    Derived terms
    * pedal pushers * push around * push-bike * pushful * push in * push off * push one's luck * pushover * push someone's buttons * push it * push-up * pushy

    Noun

    (es)
  • A short, directed application of force; an act of pushing.
  • Give the door a hard push if it sticks.
  • An act of tensing the muscles of the abdomen in order to expel its contents.
  • One more push and the baby will be out.
  • A great effort (to do something).
  • Some details got lost in the push to get the project done.
    Let's give one last push on our advertising campaign.
  • (military) A marching or drill maneuver/manoeuvre performed by moving a formation (especially a company front) forward or toward the audience, usually to accompany a dramatic climax or crescendo in the music.
  • A wager that results in no loss or gain for the bettor as a result of a tie or even score
  • (computing) The addition of a data item to the top of a stack.
  • (Internet, uncountable) The situation where a server sends data to a client without waiting for a request, as in server push'', ''push technology .
  • (dated) A crowd or throng or people
  • * 1891 , Banjo Paterson,
  • Till some wild, excited person
    Galloped down the township cursing,
    "Sydney push have mobbed Macpherson,
    Roll up, Dandaloo!"
    Derived terms
    * give someone the push

    Etymology 2

    Probably (etyl) poche. See pouch.

    Noun

    (es)
  • (obsolete, UK, dialect) A pustule; a pimple.
  • (Francis Bacon)
    1000 English basic words ----