Pursed vs Purred - What's the difference?

pursed | purred |


As verbs the difference between pursed and purred

is that pursed is (purse) while purred is (purr).

pursed

English

Verb

(head)
  • (purse)
  • Anagrams

    * * *

    purse

    English

    (wikipedia purse)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A small bag for carrying money.
  • * 1550 Mierdman, Steuen, The market or fayre of usurers
  • And then mu?t many a man occupie as farre as his pur?e would reache, and ?tretche out his legges accordynge to the length of his couerlet.
  • (US) A handbag (small bag usually used by women for carrying various small personal items)
  • A quantity of money given for a particular purpose.
  • * , Episode 12, The Cyclops
  • It was a historic and a hefty battle when Myler and Percy were scheduled to don the gloves for the purse of fifty sovereigns.
  • (historical) A specific sum of money in certain countries: formerly 500 piastres in Turkey or 50 tomans in Persia.
  • Synonyms

    * (small bag for carrying money) pocketbook; coin purse, change purse * (especially US) * (small bag used by women) handbag (especially UK) * (quantity of money) bursary, grant

    Derived terms

    * common purse * make a silk purse of a sow's ear * murse

    See also

    * wallet

    Verb

    (purs)
  • To press (one's lips) in and together so that they protrude.
  • * 1979 , (Monty Python), (Always Look on the Bright Side of Life)
  • When you're feeling in the dumps
    Don't be silly chumps
    Just purse your lips and whistle – that's the thing.
  • To draw up or contract into folds or wrinkles; to pucker; to knit.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Thou didst contract and purse thy brow.
  • To put into a purse.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I will go and purse the ducats straight.
  • (intransitive, obsolete, rare) To steal purses; to rob.
  • * Beaumont and Fletcher
  • I'll purse : I'll bet at bowling alleys.

    Synonyms

    * pucker

    Anagrams

    * ----

    purred

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (purr)

  • purr

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • Of a cat, to make a vibrating sound in its throat when contented.
  • To say (something) in a throaty, seductive manner.
  • * 2008 , C. E. Osborne, Black Gold Death in the Sun (page 12)
  • "This is Cindy," she purred again, flashing a smile of perfect white teeth surrounded by full red lips.
  • To make a vibrating throaty sound, as from pleasure.
  • (of an engine) To make a low and consistent rumbling sound.
  • * 2001 , E. C. Craver, Last Reunion (page 159)
  • Beverly passed the city limits sign with the Porsche's motor purring contentedly after its two hundred and fifty-mile romp.

    Derived terms

    * purrer * purr like a kitten

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The vibrating sound made by a cat in its throat when contented.
  • * 1918 , Sarath Kumar Ghosh, The wonders of the jungle - Volume 2 (page 113)
  • Instead, the tiger looked around, and gave a purr , and then a growl. What did that mean? The man could not tell. Then the tiger just flung upon the man some of the sand from the side of the hollow.
  • A throaty, seductive sound of pleasure made by a person.
  • * 2006 , Brenda Williamson, Wolverton Blood (page 53)
  • The trill of her purr echoed inside his mouth when he kissed her again. Clutching at his shirt, her fingers traveled the muscles in his back.
  • The low consistent rumble made by an engine at slow speed
  • * 1997 , Susan Wood, A Fly in Amber (page 191)
  • I sat still in the car and listened to the soft purr of the engine and my beating heart. Then slowly, and as silently as possible, I drove the car back to camp.

    Derived terms

    * purrlike

    See also

    * meow English onomatopoeias