Push vs Pump - What's the difference?

push | pump |


In lang=en terms the difference between push and pump

is that push is to continue to attempt to persuade a person into a particular course of action while pump is to use a pump to move liquid or gas.

In computing|lang=en terms the difference between push and pump

is that push is (computing) the addition of a data item to the top of a stack while pump is (computing) to pass (messages) into a program so that it can obey them.

As verbs the difference between push and pump

is that push is (intransitive) to apply a force to (an object) such that it moves away from the person or thing applying the force while pump is to use a pump to move (liquid or gas).

As nouns the difference between push and pump

is that push is a short, directed application of force; an act of pushing or push can be (obsolete|uk|dialect) a pustule; a pimple while pump is a device for moving or compressing a liquid or gas or pump can be (british) a type of shoe, a trainer or sneaker.

push

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) ).

Verb

(es)
  • (intransitive) To apply a force to (an object) such that it moves away from the person or thing applying the force.
  • In his anger he pushed me against the wall and threatened me.
    You need to push quite hard to get this door open.
  • To continually attempt to persuade (a person) into a particular course of action.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • We are pushed for an answer.
  • * Spectator
  • Ambition pushes the soul to such actions as are apt to procure honour to the actor.
  • To press or urge forward; to drive.
  • to push''' an objection too far; to '''push one's luck
  • * Dryden
  • to push his fortune
  • To continually promote (a point of view, a product for sale, etc.).
  • Stop pushing the issue — I'm not interested.
    They're pushing that perfume again.
    There were two men hanging around the school gates today, pushing drugs.
  • (informal) To approach; to come close to.
  • My old car is pushing 250,000 miles.
    He's pushing sixty.'' (= ''he's nearly sixty years old )
  • To tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents.
  • During childbirth, there are times when the obstetrician advises the woman not to push .
  • To continue to attempt to persuade a person into a particular course of action.
  • To make a higher bid at an auction.
  • (poker) To make an all-in bet.
  • (chess) To move (a pawn) directly forward.
  • (computing) To add (a data item) to the top of a stack.
  • * 1992 , Michael A. Miller, The 68000 Microprocessor Family: Architecture, Programming, and Applications (page 47)
  • When the microprocessor decodes the JSR opcode, it stores the operand into the TEMP register and pushes the current contents of the PC ($00 0128) onto the stack.
  • (obsolete) To thrust the points of the horns against; to gore.
  • * Bible, Exodus xxi. 32
  • If the ox shall push a manservant or maidservant, the ox shall be stoned.
  • To burst out of its pot, as a bud or shoot.
  • Synonyms
    * to press, to shove, to thrutch * (continue to attempt to persuade) to press, to urge * (continue to promote) to press, to advertise, to promote * (come close to) to approach, to near * to press, to shove, to thring * (tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents) to bear down
    Antonyms
    * (apply a force to something so it moves away) to draw, to pull, to tug * (put onto a stack) to pop
    Derived terms
    * pedal pushers * push around * push-bike * pushful * push in * push off * push one's luck * pushover * push someone's buttons * push it * push-up * pushy

    Noun

    (es)
  • A short, directed application of force; an act of pushing.
  • Give the door a hard push if it sticks.
  • An act of tensing the muscles of the abdomen in order to expel its contents.
  • One more push and the baby will be out.
  • A great effort (to do something).
  • Some details got lost in the push to get the project done.
    Let's give one last push on our advertising campaign.
  • (military) A marching or drill maneuver/manoeuvre performed by moving a formation (especially a company front) forward or toward the audience, usually to accompany a dramatic climax or crescendo in the music.
  • A wager that results in no loss or gain for the bettor as a result of a tie or even score
  • (computing) The addition of a data item to the top of a stack.
  • (Internet, uncountable) The situation where a server sends data to a client without waiting for a request, as in server push'', ''push technology .
  • (dated) A crowd or throng or people
  • * 1891 , Banjo Paterson,
  • Till some wild, excited person
    Galloped down the township cursing,
    "Sydney push have mobbed Macpherson,
    Roll up, Dandaloo!"
    Derived terms
    * give someone the push

    Etymology 2

    Probably (etyl) poche. See pouch.

    Noun

    (es)
  • (obsolete, UK, dialect) A pustule; a pimple.
  • (Francis Bacon)
    1000 English basic words ----

    pump

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) pumpe, possibly from (etyl) . Compare Dutch pompen, German pumpen, and (etyl) pompe.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A device for moving or compressing a liquid or gas.
  • An instance of the action of a pump; one stroke of a pump; any action similar to pumping
  • A device for dispensing liquid or gas to be sold, particularly fuel.
  • (bodybuilding) A swelling of the muscles caused by increased blood flow following high intensity weightlifting.
  • * 2010', Eric Velazquez, "Power Pairings", ''Reps!'' ' 17 :83
  • Want a skin-stretching pump ? Up the volume by using high-rep sets.
    A great pump is better than coming. (Arnold Schwarzenegger)
  • (colloquial) A ride on a bicycle given to a passenger, usually on the handlebars or fender.
  • (US, obsolete, slang) The heart.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To use a pump to move (liquid or gas).
  • To fill with air.
  • To move rhythmically, as the motion of a pump.
  • To shake (a person's hand) vigorously.
  • To gain information from (a person) by persistent questioning.
  • * Otway
  • But pump not me for politics.
  • To use a pump to move liquid or gas.
  • (slang) To be going very well.
  • (sports) To kick, throw or hit the ball far and high.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=February 5 , author=Michael Da Silva , title=Wigan 4 - 3 Blackburn , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Blackburn pumped long balls towards Diouf as they became increasingly desperate to salvage a point, but Wigan held on for a win that may prove crucial in their quest for Premier League survival.}}
  • (Scotland, slang) To pass gas; to fart.
  • * 2008 , (James Kelman), Kieron Smith, Boy , Penguin 2009, p. 82:
  • People never pumped , just never never, but sometimes ye got smells.
  • (computing) To pass (messages) into a program so that it can obey them.
  • * Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5 documentation for Marshal.CleanupUnusedObjectsInCurrentContext
  • The interop system pumps messages while it attempts to clean up RCWs.

    Etymology 2

    The etymology of the term is unclear and disputed. One possibility is that it comes from "Pomp" (i.e. ornamentation), claimed in Skeat & Skeat's A Concise Etymological Dictionary of the English Language'' (ISBN 9781596050921), and another is that it refers to the sound made by the foot moving inside the shoe when dancing, suggested as a probable source in Chambers's etymological dictionary (James Donald - Published by W. and R. Chambers, 1867). The Oxford English Dictionary claims that it appeared in the 16th century, and lists its origin as "obscure". It has also been linked to the Dutch ''pampoesje , possibly borrowed from Javanese "pampus", ultimately from Persian (papush) / Arabic (babush) (International archives of ethnography: Volume 9 - Intern. Gesellschaft für Ethnographie; Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsch Indië - Ter Lands-drukkerij, 1870).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (British) A type of shoe, a trainer or sneaker.
  • (chiefly, North America) A type of very high-heeled shoe; stilettoes.
  • A shoe.
  • A type of shoe without a heel (source: Dictionarium Britannicum - 1736)
  • References
    * [http://images.google.com/images?sourceid=navclient-ff&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGGL,GGGL:2006-22,GGGL:en&q=pumps%20shoes&sa=N&tab=wi] Some images. * 1591' "Gabriel's ' pumps were all unpinkt i' th' heel" -- The Taming of the Shrew, William Shakespeare
    Synonyms
    * (shoe) plimsoll (British), sneaker, trainer

    Derived terms

    * air pump * backpump * forepump * hand pump * petrol pump * price at the pump * pumped * pump fake * pump iron * pump room * pump up * stirrup pump * sump pump * under the pump ----