Pulled - What does it mean?

pulled | |

pulled

English

Verb

(head)
  • (pull)

  • pull

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to apply a force to (an object) so that it comes toward the person or thing applying the force
  • * Bible, Genesis viii. 9
  • He put forth his hand and pulled her in.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Ne'er pull your hat upon your brows.
  • To gather with the hand, or by drawing toward oneself; to pluck.
  • to pull''' fruit from a tree; to '''pull''' flax; to '''pull a finch
  • to apply a force such that an object comes toward the person or thing applying the force
  • You're going to have to pull harder to get that cork out of the bottle.
  • To attract or net; to pull in.
  • * Marcella Ridlen Ray, Changing and Unchanging Face of United States Civil Society
  • Television, a favored source of news and information, pulls the largest share of advertising monies.
  • To draw apart; to tear; to rend.
  • * Bible, Lam. iii. 11
  • He hath turned aside my ways, and pulled me in pieces; he hath made me desolate.
  • (ambitransitive, UK, Ireland, slang) to persuade (someone) to have sex with one
  • I pulled at the club last night.
    He's pulled that bird over there.
  • to remove (something), especially from public circulation or availability
  • Each day, they pulled the old bread and set out fresh loaves.
  • (informal) to do or perform
  • He regularly pulls 12-hour days, sometimes 14.
    You'll be sent home if you pull another stunt like that.
  • to retrieve or generate for use
  • I'll have to pull a part number for that.
  • * 2006 , Michael Bellomo, Joel Elad, How to Sell Anything on Amazon...and Make a Fortune!
  • They'll go through their computer system and pull a report of all your order fulfillment records for the time period you specify.
  • to toss a frisbee with the intention of launching the disc across the length of a field
  • to row
  • * 1874 , (Marcus Clarke), (For the Term of His Natural Life) Chapter VI
  • It had been a sort of race hitherto, and the rowers, with set teeth and compressed lips, had pulled stroke for stroke.
  • To strain (a muscle, tendon, ligament, etc.).
  • (video games, ambitransitive) To draw (a hostile non-player character) into combat, or toward or away from some location or target.
  • * 2003 April 9, "Richard Lawson" (username), " Monual's Willful Ignorance", in alt.games.everquest, Usenet:
  • …we had to clear a long hallway, run up half way, pull the boss mob to us, and engage.
  • * 2004 October 18, "Stush" (username), " Re: focus pull", in alt.games.dark-age-of-camelot, Usenet:
  • Basically buff pet, have it pull lots of mobs, shield pet, chain heal pet, have your aoe casters finish off hurt mobs once pet gets good aggro.
  • * 2005 August 2, "Brian" (username), " Re: How to tank Stratholme undead pulls?", in alt.games.warcraft, Usenet:
  • This is the only thing that should get you to break off from your position, is to pull something off the healer.
  • * 2007 April 10, "John Salerno" (username), " Re: Managing the Command Buttons", in alt.games.warcraft, Usenet:
  • You could also set a fire trap, pull the mob toward it, then send in your pet….
  • * 2008 August 18, "Mark (newsgroups)" (username), " Re: I'm a priest now!", in alt.games.warcraft, Usenet:
  • Shield yourself, pull' with Mind Blast if you want, or merely ' pull with SW:P to save mana, then wand, fear if you need to, but use the lowest rank fear.
  • to score a certain amount of points in a sport.
  • * How many points did you pull today, Albert?
  • (horse-racing) To hold back, and so prevent from winning.
  • The favourite was pulled .
  • (printing, dated) To take or make (a proof or impression); so called because hand presses were worked by pulling a lever.
  • (cricket) To strike the ball in a particular manner. (See noun sense.)
  • * R. H. Lyttelton
  • Never pull a straight fast ball to leg.
  • (UK, slang) To pour beer from a pump, keg, or other source.
  • Let's stop at Finnigan's. The barkeep ''pulls'' a good pint.

    Synonyms

    * drag, tow, tug, yank * score * (to remove from circulation) recall, withdraw, yank * (sense) carry out, complete, do, execute, perform * (to retrieve or generate for use) generate, get, get hold of, get one's hands on, lay one's hands on, obtain, retrieve * score

    Antonyms

    * push, repel, shove

    Derived terms

    See also pulling * it's not the whistle that pulls the train * overpull * pull a... * pull about * pull a face * pull a fast one * pull ahead * pull away * pull back * pull down * pull for * pull in * pulling * pull in one's horns * pull off * pull oneself together * pull one's weight * pull out * pull out all the stops * pull out of the fire * pull over * pull-quote * pull rank * pull round * pull somebody's leg * pull the other one * * pull the wool over someone's eyes * pull through * pull together * pull up

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An act of pulling (applying force)
  • He gave the hair a sharp pull and it came out.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • I awakened with a violent pull upon the ring which was fastened at the top of my box.
  • An attractive force which causes motion towards the source
  • The spaceship came under the pull of the gas giant.
    iron fillings drawn by the pull of a magnet
    She took a pull on her cigarette.
  • Any device meant to be pulled, as a lever, knob, handle, or rope
  • a zipper pull
  • (slang, dated) Something in one's favour in a comparison or a contest; an advantage; means of influencing.
  • In weights the favourite had the pull .
  • Appeal or attraction (as of a movie star)
  • (Internet, uncountable) The situation where a client sends out a request for data from a server, as in server pull'', ''pull technology
  • A journey made by rowing
  • * 1874 , (Marcus Clarke), (For the Term of His Natural Life) Chapter V
  • As Blunt had said, the burning ship lay a good twelve miles from the Malabar, and the pull was a long and a weary one. Once fairly away from the protecting sides of the vessel that had borne them thus far on their dismal journey, the adventurers seemed to have come into a new atmosphere.
  • (dated) A contest; a struggle.
  • a wrestling pull
    (Carew)
  • (obsolete, poetic) Loss or violence suffered.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Two pulls at once; / His lady banished, and a limb lopped off.
  • (slang) The act of drinking.
  • to take a pull at a mug of beer
    (Charles Dickens)
  • (cricket) A kind of stroke by which a leg ball is sent to the off side, or an off ball to the side.
  • * R. A. Proctor
  • The pull is not a legitimate stroke, but bad cricket.

    Synonyms

    * (act of pulling) tug, yank * (attractive force) attraction * (device meant to be pulled) handle, knob, lever, rope * (influence) influence, sway

    Antonyms

    * (act of pulling) push, shove * (attractive force) repulsion * (device meant to be pulled) button, push, push button * (influence)

    Derived terms

    * on the pull * pull cord * ring-pull

    Not English

    has no English definition. It may be misspelled.