Prune vs Prune - What's the difference?

prune | prune |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between prune and prune

is that prune is (obsolete) to preen; to prepare; to dress while prune is (obsolete) to preen; to prepare; to dress.

In slang|lang=en terms the difference between prune and prune

is that prune is (slang) an old woman, especially a wrinkly one while prune is (slang) an old woman, especially a wrinkly one.

In lang=en terms the difference between prune and prune

is that prune is to remove excess material from a tree or shrub; to trim, especially to make more healthy or productive while prune is to remove excess material from a tree or shrub; to trim, especially to make more healthy or productive.

In figuratively|lang=en terms the difference between prune and prune

is that prune is (figuratively) to cut down or shorten (by the removal of unnecessary material) while prune is (figuratively) to cut down or shorten (by the removal of unnecessary material).

As nouns the difference between prune and prune

is that prune is (obsolete) a plum while prune is (obsolete) a plum.

As verbs the difference between prune and prune

is that prune is to remove excess material from a tree or shrub; to trim, especially to make more healthy or productive while prune is to remove excess material from a tree or shrub; to trim, especially to make more healthy or productive.

prune

English

(wikipedia prune)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) prune, from (etyl) , a loanword from a language of Asia Minor.

Noun

(en noun)
  • (obsolete) A plum.
  • The dried, wrinkled fruit of certain species of plum.
  • (slang) An old woman, especially a wrinkly one.
  • Synonyms
    * see
    Derived terms
    * German prune * prune tree * pruney * South African prune

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) 'to round-off the front'.

    Verb

    (prun)
  • To remove excess material from a tree or shrub; to trim, especially to make more healthy or productive.
  • A good grape grower will prune his vines once a year.
  • * Milton
  • Our delightful task / To prune these growing plants, and tend these flowers.
  • (figuratively) To cut down or shorten (by the removal of unnecessary material).
  • to prune a budget, or an essay
  • * Francis Bacon
  • taking into consideration how they [laws] are to be pruned and reformed
  • (obsolete) To preen; to prepare; to dress.
  • * Shakespeare
  • His royal bird / Prunes the immortal wing and cloys his beak.
    (Dryden)
    (Spenser)
    Derived terms
    * (l) * (l)

    Anagrams

    * ----

    prune

    English

    (wikipedia prune)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) prune, from (etyl) , a loanword from a language of Asia Minor.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A plum.
  • The dried, wrinkled fruit of certain species of plum.
  • (slang) An old woman, especially a wrinkly one.
  • Synonyms
    * see
    Derived terms
    * German prune * prune tree * pruney * South African prune

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) 'to round-off the front'.

    Verb

    (prun)
  • To remove excess material from a tree or shrub; to trim, especially to make more healthy or productive.
  • A good grape grower will prune his vines once a year.
  • * Milton
  • Our delightful task / To prune these growing plants, and tend these flowers.
  • (figuratively) To cut down or shorten (by the removal of unnecessary material).
  • to prune a budget, or an essay
  • * Francis Bacon
  • taking into consideration how they [laws] are to be pruned and reformed
  • (obsolete) To preen; to prepare; to dress.
  • * Shakespeare
  • His royal bird / Prunes the immortal wing and cloys his beak.
    (Dryden)
    (Spenser)
    Derived terms
    * (l) * (l)

    Anagrams

    * ----