Arow vs Prow - What's the difference?

arow | prow |


As an adverb arow

is in a row, line, or rank; successively.

As a noun prow is

(nautical) the fore part of a vessel; the bow; the stem; hence, the vessel itself or prow can be .

As an adjective prow is

(archaic) brave, valiant, gallant merriam webster’s online dictionary – prow [http://wwwmerriam-webstercom/dictionary/prow%5b1%5d].

arow

English

Adverb

(-)
  • In a row, line, or rank; successively.
  • (Shakespeare)
    (Dryden)
    (Webster 1913)

    prow

    English

    Etymology 1

    (wikipedia prow) From (etyl) (m), from Genoese Italian (m), (m), from (etyl) prora, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (nautical) The fore part of a vessel; the bow; the stem; hence, the vessel itself.
  • * Milton
  • The floating vessel swum / Uplifted, and secure with beaked prow / rode tilting o'er the waves.
  • * 1918 , (Edgar Rice Burroughs), Chapter IV
  • We were already rather close in; but I ordered the U-33's prow turned inshore and we crept slowly along, constantly dipping up the water and tasting it to assure ourselves that we didn't get outside the fresh-water current.
    Synonyms
    * prore

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl), from (etyl) prou, from prode; more at (proud).

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (archaic) Brave, valiant, gallant. Merriam Webster’s Online Dictionary – prow [http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prow%5B1%5D]
  • *
  • For they be two the prowest knights on ground, / And oft approu’d in many hard assay

    References

    Etymology 3

    Noun

    (en noun)