Proofed vs Prove - What's the difference?

proofed | prove |


As verbs the difference between proofed and prove

is that proofed is (proof) while prove is .

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

proofed

English

Verb

(head)
  • (proof)

  • proof

    English

    (wikipedia proof)

    Noun

  • (countable) An effort, process, or operation designed to establish or discover a fact or truth; an act of testing; a test; a trial.
  • * 1591 , , ''Humorous Poems ,
  • But the false Fox most kindly played his part,
    For whatsoever mother-wit or art
    Could work he put in proof . No practice sly,
    No counterpoint of cunning policy,
    No reach, no breach, that might him profit bring.
    But he the same did to his purpose wring.
  • * c. 1633 , , Act 1, Scene 1,
  • France I more praise and love; you are, my lord,
    Yourself for horsemanship much famed; and there
    You shall have many proofs to shew your skill.
  • * 1831 , , A System of Chemistry of Inorganic Bodies , Volume 2,
  • A given quantity of the spirits was poured upon a quantity of gunpowder in a dish and set on fire. If at the end of the combustion, the gunpowder continued dry enough, it took fire and exploded; but if it had been wetted by the water in the spirits, the flame of the alcohol went out without setting the powder on fire. This was called the proof .
  • (uncountable) The degree of evidence which convinces the mind of any truth or fact, and produces belief; a test by facts or arguments which induce, or tend to induce, certainty of the judgment; conclusive evidence; demonstration.
  • * c.1603 , ,
  • I'll have some proof .
  • * 1841 , '' in ''Essays: First Series ,
  • It was a grand sentence of Emanuel Swedenborg, which would alone indicate the greatness of that man's perception, — "It is no proof of a man's understanding to be able to confirm whatever he pleases; but to be able to discern that what is true is true, and that what is false is false, this is the mark and character of intelligence."
  • * 1990 October 16, ,
  • Faith, faith is an island in the setting sun
    But proof , yes
    Proof is the bottom line for everyone
  • The quality or state of having been proved or tried; firmness or hardness which resists impression, or doesn't yield to force; impenetrability of physical bodies.
  • (obsolete) Experience of something.
  • * 1590 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , III.1:
  • But the chaste damzell, that had never priefe / Of such malengine and fine forgerye, / Did easely beleeve her strong extremitye.
  • (uncountable, obsolete) Firmness of mind; stability not to be shaken.
  • (countable, printing) A proof sheet; a trial impression, as from type, taken for correction or examination.
  • (countable, logic, mathematics) A sequence of statements consisting of axioms, assumptions, statements already demonstrated in another proof, and statements that logically follow from previous statements in the sequence, and which concludes with a statement that is the object of the proof.
  • (countable, mathematics) A process for testing the accuracy of an operation performed. Compare prove, transitive verb , 5.
  • (obsolete) Armour of excellent or tried quality, and deemed impenetrable; properly, armour of proof.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (US) A measure of the alcohol content of liquor. Originally, in Britain, 100 proof' was defined as 57.1% by volume (not used anymore). In the US, 100 '''proof''' means that the alcohol content is 50% of the total volume of the liquid, and thus, absolute alcohol would be 200 ' proof .
  • Hyponyms

    * testimony * evidence * reason * argument * trial * demonstration

    Derived terms

    * artist's proof * burden of proof * conditional proof * prooflike * proof reader * proof of concept

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Used in proving or testing.
  • a proof''' load''; ''a '''proof charge
  • Firm or successful in resisting.
  • proof against harm
    water'''proof'''''; '''''bombproof .
  • * 1671 , '', 1820, Dr Aiken (biographies), ''Select Works of the British Poets , page 125,
  • And opportunity I here have had / To try thee, sift thee, and confess have found thee / Proof against all temptation as a rock / Of adamant, and, as a centre, firm :
  • * 1790 , , Reflections on the Revolution in France'', 1803, ''The Works of The Right Honourable Edmund Burke , Volume 5, page426,
  • This was a good, ?tout proof article of faith, pronounced under an anathema, by the venerable fathers of this philo?ophick ?ynod.
  • (of alcoholic liquors) Being of a certain standard as to alcohol content.
  • Derived terms

    * * bulletproof * mothproof * sale-proof * foolproof * childproof * waterproof * prooftext * shatter-proof

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To proofread.
  • (lb) To make resistant, especially to water.
  • To allow to rise (of yeast-containing dough).
  • To test the activeness of (yeast).
  • prove

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) proven, from (etyl) . More at (l), (l), (l).

    Alternative forms

    * proove

    Verb

  • To demonstrate that something is true or viable; to give proof for.
  • {{quote-Fanny Hill, part=3 , Mr. H …, whom no distinctions of that sort seemed to disturb, scarce gave himself or me breathing time from the last encounter, but, as if he had task'd himself to prove that the appearances of his vigour were not signs hung out in vain, in a few minutes he was in a condition for renewing the onset}}
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=August 5, author=Nathan Rabin
  • , title= TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “I Love Lisa” (season 4, episode 15; originally aired 02/11/1993) , passage=Valentine’s Day means different things for different people. For Homer, it means forking over a hundred dollars for a dusty box of chocolates at the Kwik-E-Mart after characteristically forgetting the holiday yet again. For Ned, it’s another opportunity to prove his love for his wife. Most germane to the episode, for Lisa, Valentine’s Day means being the only person in her entire class to give Ralph a Valentine after noticing him looking crestfallen and alone at his desk.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author=(Gary Younge)
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=18, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Hypocrisy lies at heart of Manning prosecution , passage=WikiLeaks did not cause these uprisings but it certainly informed them. The dispatches revealed details of corruption and kleptocracy that many Tunisians suspected, but could not prove , and would cite as they took to the streets. They also exposed the blatant discrepancy between the west's professed values and actual foreign policies.}}
  • To turn out; to manifest.
  • (copulative) To turn out to be.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=May 5, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool , passage=He met Luis Suarez's cross at the far post, only for Chelsea keeper Petr Cech to show brilliant reflexes to deflect his header on to the bar. Carroll turned away to lead Liverpool's insistent protests that the ball had crossed the line but referee Phil Dowd and assistant referee Andrew Garratt waved play on, with even a succession of replays proving inconclusive.}}
  • To put to the test, to make trial of.
  • To ascertain or establish the genuineness or validity of; to verify.
  • to prove a will
  • (archaic) To experience
  • * Spenser
  • Where she, captived long, great woes did prove .
  • (printing, dated, transitive) To take a trial impression of; to take a proof of.
  • to prove a page
    Derived terms
    * disprovability * disprovable, disprovably * disprove * disproved, disproven * exception that proves the rule * provability * provable * provably * prove out * prover * proving ground * unprovability * unprovable * unprovably * unprove * unproved * unproven

    Etymology 2

    Simple past form of proove, conjugated in the Germanic strong declension, on the pattern of choose ? chose.

    Verb

    (head)
  • (proove)
  • Statistics

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