Direct vs Protest - What's the difference?

direct | protest | Related terms |

Direct is a related term of protest.


As an adjective direct

is straight, constant, without interruption.

As an adverb direct

is directly.

As a verb direct

is to manage, control, steer.

As a noun protest is

protest.

direct

English

Adjective

(er)
  • Straight, constant, without interruption.
  • Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end.
  • the most direct route between two buildings
  • Straightforward; sincere.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Be even and direct with me.
  • Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous.
  • * John Locke
  • He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words.
  • * Hallam
  • a direct and avowed interference with elections
  • In the line of descent; not collateral.
  • a descendant in the direct line
  • (astronomy) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; said of the motion of a celestial body.
  • Antonyms

    * indirect

    Derived terms

    * direct action * direct current * direct flight * direct initiative * direct object * direct quote

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Directly.
  • * 2009 , Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall , Fourth Estate 2010, p. 346:
  • Presumably Mary is to carry messages that she, Anne, is too delicate to convey direct .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To manage, control, steer.
  • to direct the affairs of a nation or the movements of an army
  • To aim (something) at (something else).
  • They directed their fire towards the men on the wall.
    He directed his question to the room in general.
  • To point out or show to (somebody) the right course or way; to guide, as by pointing out the way.
  • He directed me to the left-hand road.
  • * Lubbock
  • the next points to which I will direct your attention
  • To point out to with authority; to instruct as a superior; to order.
  • She directed them to leave immediately.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll first direct my men what they shall do.
  • (dated) To put a direction or address upon; to mark with the name and residence of the person to whom anything is sent.
  • to direct a letter

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    protest

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (label) To make a strong objection.
  • :
  • :
  • *
  • *:As a political system democracy seems to me extraordinarily foolish, but I would not go out of my way to protest against it. My servant is, so far as I am concerned, welcome to as many votes as he can get. I would very gladly make mine over to him if I could.
  • *
  • (label) To affirm (something).
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:I will protest your cowardice.
  • *1919 , , (The Moon and Sixpence) ,
  • *:She flashed a smile at me, and, protesting an engagement with her dentist, jauntily walked on.
  • To object to.
  • :
  • To call as a witness in affirming or denying, or to prove an affirmation; to appeal to.
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:Fiercely [they] opposed / My journey strange, with clamorous uproar / Protesting fate supreme.
  • to make a solemn written declaration, in due form, on behalf of the holder, against all parties liable for any loss or damage to be sustained by non-acceptance or non-payment of (a bill or note). This should be made by a notary public, whose seal it is the usual practice to affix.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • A formal objection, especially one by a group.
  • A collective gesture of disapproval: a demonstration.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-10, volume=408, issue=8848, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Can China clean up fast enough? , passage=All this has led to an explosion of protest across China, including among a middle class that has discovered nimbyism.}}

    Synonyms

    * dissent * objection * protestation

    Derived terms

    * Protestant * protestation * protester * protest march * under protest

    Anagrams

    * * English heteronyms ----