Prosumer vs Consumer - What's the difference?

prosumer | consumer |


As nouns the difference between prosumer and consumer

is that prosumer is (buzzword) a person in postindustrial society who combines the economic roles of producer and consumer or prosumer can be a serious, enthusiastic consumer: not professional (earning money), but of similar interest and skills to a (generally lower level) professional, or aspiring to such the target market of prosumer equipment while consumer is one who, or that which, consumes.

As an adjective prosumer

is (marketing|of a consumer product) targeted at serious, enthusiastic consumers, incorporating professional features but often modified for non-professional use.

prosumer

Etymology 1

, coined by futurologist (Alvin Toffler) in his book (The Third Wave) (1980). Concept based on suggestion by (Marshall McLuhan) and Barrington Nevitt in their 1972 book Take Today (p. 4) that consumers would take on producer roles in (mass customization).

Noun

(en noun)
  • (buzzword) A person in postindustrial society who combines the economic roles of producer and consumer.
  • Etymology 2

    .

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (marketing, of a consumer product) Targeted at serious, enthusiastic consumers, incorporating professional features but often modified for non-professional use.
  • (marketing, of a consumer product) high-end
  • Usage notes
    The line between consumer and professional equipment, and hence prosumer, is fuzzy, as consumers can purchase and use professional equipment, while professionals may use equipment targeted at consumers; conversely, a professional person is unambiguously one who is paid for their work. Any product may be marketed as prosumer (compare (gourmet)), but generally professional equipment differs in being high-volume, while consumer equipment is more designed for ease of use. For example a professional espresso machine is designed for commercial use, for repeatedly and rapidly making drinks throughout a day, while a prosumer machine is designed for home use, especially making a single or a few drinks without extensive preparation (“walk-up use”). The use of the term varies significantly between products – it is frequently used to describe still cameras, but virtually never used to describe sports cars.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A serious, enthusiastic consumer: not professional (earning money), but of similar interest and skills to a (generally lower level) professional, or aspiring to such. The target market of prosumer equipment.
  • Synonyms
    * amateur * enthusiast * hobbyist * semiprofessional

    consumer

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who, or that which, consumes.
  • * {{quote-book, year=2006, author=
  • , title=Internal Combustion , chapter=2 citation , passage=But through the oligopoly, charcoal fuel proliferated throughout London's trades and industries. By the 1200s, brewers and bakers, tilemakers, glassblowers, pottery producers, and a range of other craftsmen all became hour-to-hour consumers of charcoal.}}
  • (economics) someone who trades money for goods as an individual.
  • This new system favours the consumer over the producer.
  • (biology) an organism that uses other organisms for food in order to gain energy.
  • Derived terms

    * anticonsumer * consumerist * consumerism

    Antonyms

    * (economics) and (biology): producer

    See also

    biology * carnivore * decomposer * detritivore * first-order consumer * herbivore * omnivore * producer * scavenger * second-order consumer English agent nouns ----