Prop vs Strut - What's the difference?

prop | strut |


As nouns the difference between prop and strut

is that prop is an object placed against or under another, to support it; anything that supports or prop can be (theater|film) an item placed on a stage or set to create a scene or scenario in which actors perform contraction of "property" or prop can be the propeller of an aircraft or prop can be a proposition, especially on an election-day ballot while strut is a proud step or walk, with the head erect; affected dignity in walking or strut can be a support rod.

As verbs the difference between prop and strut

is that prop is to support or shore up something while strut is to swell; protuberate; bulge or spread out or strut can be (construction) to brace or support by a strut ot struts; hold in place or strengthen by an upright, diagonal, or transverse support.

As an adjective strut is

(archaic) swelling out; protuberant; bulging.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

prop

English

Etymology 1

Akin to German Pfropfen and Danish proppe, compare Latin

Noun

(en noun)
  • An object placed against or under another, to support it; anything that supports.
  • They stuck a block of wood under it as a prop .
  • (rugby) The player who is next to the hooker in a scrum.
  • One of the seashells in the game of props.
  • Verb

    (propp)
  • To support or shore up something.
  • Try using a phone book to prop up the table where the foot is missing.

    Etymology 2

    Abbreviation of property.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (theater, film) An item placed on a stage or set to create a scene or scenario in which actors perform. Contraction of "property".
  • They used the trophy as a prop in the movie.
    Usage notes
    * In stagecraft, usually the term (term) is reserved for an object with which an actor or performer interacts (e.g., a glass, a book or a weapon). Larger items adding to the scene, (e.g. chairs) are considered part of the set. * Props are often non-functional. A prop that is required to function is a "practical" prop.

    Etymology 3

    Abbreviation of propeller.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The propeller of an aircraft.
  • Etymology 4

    Abbreviation of proposition.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A proposition, especially on an election-day ballot.
  • Derived terms
    * prop wash * warm prop ----

    strut

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) , now in Alemannic)

    Alternative forms

    * (l), (l) (dialectal)

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To swell; protuberate; bulge or spread out.
  • * Dryden
  • The bellying canvas strutted with the gale.
  • (originally said of fowl) To stand or walk stiffly, with the tail erect and spread out.
  • To walk proudly or haughtily.
  • He strutted about the yard, thinking himself master of all he surveyed.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Does he not hold up his head, and strut in his gait?
  • (obsolete) To cause to swell; enlarge; give more importance to.
  • To protrude; cause to bulge.
  • Synonyms
    * (To walk proudly or haughtily) swagger
    Derived terms
    * bestrut * strut one's stuff

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), (m), (m), from (m), . See above.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A proud step or walk, with the head erect; affected dignity in walking.
  • Etymology 3

    From a contraction of strutted.

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (archaic) Swelling out; protuberant; bulging.
  • Etymology 4

    Origin obscure, but apparently related to (m) above. Cognate with (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A support rod.
  • Verb

    (en-verb)
  • (construction) To brace or support by a strut ot struts; hold in place or strengthen by an upright, diagonal, or transverse support.
  • Anagrams

    * (l), (l) ----