Proof vs Model - What's the difference?

proof | model |


As nouns the difference between proof and model

is that proof is (countable) an effort, process, or operation designed to establish or discover a fact or truth; an act of testing; a test; a trial while model is a person who serves as a subject for artwork or fashion, usually in the medium of photography but also for painting or drawing.

As adjectives the difference between proof and model

is that proof is used in proving or testing while model is worthy of being a model; exemplary.

As verbs the difference between proof and model

is that proof is to proofread while model is to display for others to see, especially in regard to wearing clothing while performing the role of a fashion model.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

proof

English

(wikipedia proof)

Noun

  • (countable) An effort, process, or operation designed to establish or discover a fact or truth; an act of testing; a test; a trial.
  • * 1591 , , ''Humorous Poems ,
  • But the false Fox most kindly played his part,
    For whatsoever mother-wit or art
    Could work he put in proof . No practice sly,
    No counterpoint of cunning policy,
    No reach, no breach, that might him profit bring.
    But he the same did to his purpose wring.
  • * c. 1633 , , Act 1, Scene 1,
  • France I more praise and love; you are, my lord,
    Yourself for horsemanship much famed; and there
    You shall have many proofs to shew your skill.
  • * 1831 , , A System of Chemistry of Inorganic Bodies , Volume 2,
  • A given quantity of the spirits was poured upon a quantity of gunpowder in a dish and set on fire. If at the end of the combustion, the gunpowder continued dry enough, it took fire and exploded; but if it had been wetted by the water in the spirits, the flame of the alcohol went out without setting the powder on fire. This was called the proof .
  • (uncountable) The degree of evidence which convinces the mind of any truth or fact, and produces belief; a test by facts or arguments which induce, or tend to induce, certainty of the judgment; conclusive evidence; demonstration.
  • * c.1603 , ,
  • I'll have some proof .
  • * 1841 , '' in ''Essays: First Series ,
  • It was a grand sentence of Emanuel Swedenborg, which would alone indicate the greatness of that man's perception, — "It is no proof of a man's understanding to be able to confirm whatever he pleases; but to be able to discern that what is true is true, and that what is false is false, this is the mark and character of intelligence."
  • * 1990 October 16, ,
  • Faith, faith is an island in the setting sun
    But proof , yes
    Proof is the bottom line for everyone
  • The quality or state of having been proved or tried; firmness or hardness which resists impression, or doesn't yield to force; impenetrability of physical bodies.
  • (obsolete) Experience of something.
  • * 1590 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , III.1:
  • But the chaste damzell, that had never priefe / Of such malengine and fine forgerye, / Did easely beleeve her strong extremitye.
  • (uncountable, obsolete) Firmness of mind; stability not to be shaken.
  • (countable, printing) A proof sheet; a trial impression, as from type, taken for correction or examination.
  • (countable, logic, mathematics) A sequence of statements consisting of axioms, assumptions, statements already demonstrated in another proof, and statements that logically follow from previous statements in the sequence, and which concludes with a statement that is the object of the proof.
  • (countable, mathematics) A process for testing the accuracy of an operation performed. Compare prove, transitive verb , 5.
  • (obsolete) Armour of excellent or tried quality, and deemed impenetrable; properly, armour of proof.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (US) A measure of the alcohol content of liquor. Originally, in Britain, 100 proof' was defined as 57.1% by volume (not used anymore). In the US, 100 '''proof''' means that the alcohol content is 50% of the total volume of the liquid, and thus, absolute alcohol would be 200 ' proof .
  • Hyponyms

    * testimony * evidence * reason * argument * trial * demonstration

    Derived terms

    * artist's proof * burden of proof * conditional proof * prooflike * proof reader * proof of concept

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Used in proving or testing.
  • a proof''' load''; ''a '''proof charge
  • Firm or successful in resisting.
  • proof against harm
    water'''proof'''''; '''''bombproof .
  • * 1671 , '', 1820, Dr Aiken (biographies), ''Select Works of the British Poets , page 125,
  • And opportunity I here have had / To try thee, sift thee, and confess have found thee / Proof against all temptation as a rock / Of adamant, and, as a centre, firm :
  • * 1790 , , Reflections on the Revolution in France'', 1803, ''The Works of The Right Honourable Edmund Burke , Volume 5, page426,
  • This was a good, ?tout proof article of faith, pronounced under an anathema, by the venerable fathers of this philo?ophick ?ynod.
  • (of alcoholic liquors) Being of a certain standard as to alcohol content.
  • Derived terms

    * * bulletproof * mothproof * sale-proof * foolproof * childproof * waterproof * prooftext * shatter-proof

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To proofread.
  • (lb) To make resistant, especially to water.
  • To allow to rise (of yeast-containing dough).
  • To test the activeness of (yeast).
  • model

    English

    (wikipedia model)

    Alternative forms

    * modell

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A person who serves as a subject for artwork or fashion, usually in the medium of photography but also for painting or drawing.
  • A person, usually an attractive female, hired to show items or goods to the public, such as items given away as prizes on a TV game show.
  • A representation of a physical object, usually in miniature.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I had my father's signet in my purse, / Which was the model of that Danish seal.
  • * Addison
  • You have the models of several ancient temples, though the temples and the gods are perished.
  • A simplified representation used to explain the workings of a real world system or event.
  • A style, type, or design.
  • The structural design of a complex system.
  • A successful example to be copied, with or without modifications.
  • He was a model of eloquence and virtue.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=70, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Engineers of a different kind , passage=Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers.
  • (logic) An interpretation function which assigns a truth value to each atomic proposition.
  • (logic) An interpretation which makes a certain sentence true, in which case that interpretation is called a model of that sentence.
  • A particular style, design, or make of a particular product.
  • (manufacturing) An identifier of a product given by its manufacturer (also called model number).
  • Any copy, or resemblance, more or less exact.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Thou seest thy wretched brother die, / Who was the model of thy father's life.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * abstract model * animal model * arbitrage pricing model * business model * causal model * commercial model * computer model * conceptual model * data model * database model * Document Object Model * economy model * enterprise architecture model * entity-relationship model * fashion model * fetish model * fitness model * glamour model * information model * late model * mark to model * mathematical model * mental model * model aircraft * model checking * model organism * model solution * model theory * modelizer * modelly * multimodel * off-model * plamodel * production model * relational model * role model * runway model * scale model * scientific model * spokesmodel * supermodel * waterfall model * water-line model * view model

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Worthy of being a model; exemplary.
  • * (rfdate), Blackwood's Magazine , volume 289, page 525:
  • At our approach the animals made so much noise that the owners of the hut peered round the door to see what was the matter; outwardly rather less model than the farm, there appeared two ancient Basques, emblematically black-bereted, gnarled [...]
  • * 1898 , John Thorburn, The St. Andrew's Society of Ottawa: 1846-1897 : sketch , page 40:
  • [...] from the land of your origin, because you demand the claims of those who believe it more model than yours, [...]
  • * 1932 , Nora Fugger, James Austin Galaston (translator), The Glory of the Habsburgs: the Memoirs of Princess Fugger , page 35:
  • Methods of game-preservation in their extensive and well-stocked hunting-grounds were as model as the huntsmanlike management of the hunts.
  • * 1934 , Charles Ryle Fay, Imperial economy and its place in the formation of economic doctrine, 1600-1932 , page 143:
  • [...] and we press with special severity on one small country whose agriculture is as model as is her way of rural life.
  • * 1956 , Stephen Rynne, All Ireland , page 54:
  • True, it is an untidy county; the farmhouses are much more model' than the farms (when we reach Antrim we shall find that the farms are more ' model than the farmhouses).
  • * 1968 , American County Government , volume 33, page 19:
  • But not all the exchanges were as model as the sergeant. Some of the exchangees showed a rigidity and reluctance to adapt.
  • * 1999 , Michael D. Williams, Acquisition for the 21st century: the F-22 Development Program , page 113:
  • It is as model as you can get.
  • * 2002 , Uma Anand Segal, A framework for immigration: Asians in the United States , page 308:
  • While Asians have been perceived as the model minority, it is increasingly clear that some Asian groups are more model than are others, and even within these model groups, a division exists [...]
  • * 2010 , Eleanor Coppola, Notes on a Life , page 140:
  • All were neat and well kept which added to the sense that they were more model than real.

    Synonyms

    * (worthy of being a model) ideal

    Verb

  • To display for others to see, especially in regard to wearing clothing while performing the role of a fashion model.
  • She modelled the shoes for her friends to see.
  • To use as an object in the creation of a forecast or model.
  • They modelled the data with a computer to analyze the experiment’s results.
  • To make a miniature model of.
  • He takes great pride in his skill at modeling airplanes.
  • To create from a substance such as clay.
  • The sculptor modelled the clay into the form of a dolphin.
  • To make a or models.
  • To be a model of any kind.
  • The actress used to model before being discovered by Hollywood.

    Synonyms

    * modelise, US modelize