Corroborate vs Proof - What's the difference?

corroborate | proof |


As verbs the difference between corroborate and proof

is that corroborate is to confirm or support something with additional evidence; to attest or vouch for while proof is to proofread.

As a noun proof is

(countable) an effort, process, or operation designed to establish or discover a fact or truth; an act of testing; a test; a trial.

As an adjective proof is

used in proving or testing.

corroborate

English

Verb

(corroborat)
  • To confirm or support something with additional evidence; to attest or vouch for.
  • * I. Taylor
  • The concurrence of all corroborates the same truth.
  • To make strong; to strengthen.
  • * I. Watts
  • As any limb well and duly exercised, grows stronger, the nerves of the body are corroborated thereby.

    proof

    English

    (wikipedia proof)

    Noun

  • (countable) An effort, process, or operation designed to establish or discover a fact or truth; an act of testing; a test; a trial.
  • * 1591 , , ''Humorous Poems ,
  • But the false Fox most kindly played his part,
    For whatsoever mother-wit or art
    Could work he put in proof . No practice sly,
    No counterpoint of cunning policy,
    No reach, no breach, that might him profit bring.
    But he the same did to his purpose wring.
  • * c. 1633 , , Act 1, Scene 1,
  • France I more praise and love; you are, my lord,
    Yourself for horsemanship much famed; and there
    You shall have many proofs to shew your skill.
  • * 1831 , , A System of Chemistry of Inorganic Bodies , Volume 2,
  • A given quantity of the spirits was poured upon a quantity of gunpowder in a dish and set on fire. If at the end of the combustion, the gunpowder continued dry enough, it took fire and exploded; but if it had been wetted by the water in the spirits, the flame of the alcohol went out without setting the powder on fire. This was called the proof .
  • (uncountable) The degree of evidence which convinces the mind of any truth or fact, and produces belief; a test by facts or arguments which induce, or tend to induce, certainty of the judgment; conclusive evidence; demonstration.
  • * c.1603 , ,
  • I'll have some proof .
  • * 1841 , '' in ''Essays: First Series ,
  • It was a grand sentence of Emanuel Swedenborg, which would alone indicate the greatness of that man's perception, — "It is no proof of a man's understanding to be able to confirm whatever he pleases; but to be able to discern that what is true is true, and that what is false is false, this is the mark and character of intelligence."
  • * 1990 October 16, ,
  • Faith, faith is an island in the setting sun
    But proof , yes
    Proof is the bottom line for everyone
  • The quality or state of having been proved or tried; firmness or hardness which resists impression, or doesn't yield to force; impenetrability of physical bodies.
  • (obsolete) Experience of something.
  • * 1590 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , III.1:
  • But the chaste damzell, that had never priefe / Of such malengine and fine forgerye, / Did easely beleeve her strong extremitye.
  • (uncountable, obsolete) Firmness of mind; stability not to be shaken.
  • (countable, printing) A proof sheet; a trial impression, as from type, taken for correction or examination.
  • (countable, logic, mathematics) A sequence of statements consisting of axioms, assumptions, statements already demonstrated in another proof, and statements that logically follow from previous statements in the sequence, and which concludes with a statement that is the object of the proof.
  • (countable, mathematics) A process for testing the accuracy of an operation performed. Compare prove, transitive verb , 5.
  • (obsolete) Armour of excellent or tried quality, and deemed impenetrable; properly, armour of proof.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (US) A measure of the alcohol content of liquor. Originally, in Britain, 100 proof' was defined as 57.1% by volume (not used anymore). In the US, 100 '''proof''' means that the alcohol content is 50% of the total volume of the liquid, and thus, absolute alcohol would be 200 ' proof .
  • Hyponyms

    * testimony * evidence * reason * argument * trial * demonstration

    Derived terms

    * artist's proof * burden of proof * conditional proof * prooflike * proof reader * proof of concept

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Used in proving or testing.
  • a proof''' load''; ''a '''proof charge
  • Firm or successful in resisting.
  • proof against harm
    water'''proof'''''; '''''bombproof .
  • * 1671 , '', 1820, Dr Aiken (biographies), ''Select Works of the British Poets , page 125,
  • And opportunity I here have had / To try thee, sift thee, and confess have found thee / Proof against all temptation as a rock / Of adamant, and, as a centre, firm :
  • * 1790 , , Reflections on the Revolution in France'', 1803, ''The Works of The Right Honourable Edmund Burke , Volume 5, page426,
  • This was a good, ?tout proof article of faith, pronounced under an anathema, by the venerable fathers of this philo?ophick ?ynod.
  • (of alcoholic liquors) Being of a certain standard as to alcohol content.
  • Derived terms

    * * bulletproof * mothproof * sale-proof * foolproof * childproof * waterproof * prooftext * shatter-proof

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To proofread.
  • (lb) To make resistant, especially to water.
  • To allow to rise (of yeast-containing dough).
  • To test the activeness of (yeast).